exercise

I’ve been told that exercise could help with my MS, I’m not sure how it can help tho. Getting things sorted with my physio is proving difficult.

What type of exercise do people that helps with MS?

I just do lots of stretching, light weights and a bit of Yoga. The trouble with exercise and MS, is that before MS we are used to seeing improvement in our fitness when we exercise, a sort of reward. With MS the best we hope for is not getting worse so no reward to speak of. I did get the MS DVD from this website which features Sally Gunnell and found it quite useful. Good luck Minnie!. Peter

Getting up the energy to do any exercise is my problem but when i can i really enjoy going swimming even just walking around the pool in the water is good just dont do too much as its easy to get carried away. Always sleep well and feel a bit brighter the next day , i did try water aerobics but found that too much and only managed 20 min of an hour class. But i am sure what ever you can manage will feel good and worthwhile and thats all that matters . Have fun whatever you try. Katy

I have specific exercises from my physio to strengthen my core muscles and improve my balance. My physio also advised doing whatever form of exercise I enjoy to improve my general fitness - walking, swimming, cycling (exercise bike: with my balance, 2 wheels is asking for trouble!), whatever.

What is best depends on what you want: general fitness or targeted exercise to tackle a specific problem. For the former, choose something you enjoy, start gently and build up. For the latter, you really need guidance from your physio but searching ‘MS exercises’ on the internet may give you some ideas of things you can do.

My exercises are making a difference to my balance and walking and I do feel better for doing them, even if it is an effort some days.

Have a watch here it does work

Over time you put strength back into your legs and arms, you can also get rid of drop foot or at least make it not so much of a problem.

My foot drop as totally gone and strength in legs is back. Depending on the type of MS you have and what you suffer from you may have to be a bit gentle with exercise and build up slowly but still do 2 or 3 times a week, regular is key.

People with MS using sticks, crutches and wheelchairs all come to the gym with me and been doing it for 2 years now.
People who go often benefit the most.

[quote=may98]

like Mitzi I saw a neurophysio who gave me exercises for core strength & stability and also ones to improve my balance. Also go to pilates classes now and do some practice in between at home. I was quite strong before and it is a bit hard to accept that things will never be the same again (age creeps in as well!), but I have definitely improved with these exercises. I agree that stretching exercises are really important.

I think DVDs are great but it is best to have some hands on instruction to make sure you are doing things correctly. I also paid for a few 1 to 1 sessions with a physio. There have been some posts about MS therapy centres recently and it looks as though some are able to ffer physio sessions, ? is that more accessible than the NHS physio.

hi may

i go to trafford ms therapy centre and they offer physiotherapy for a cost of £10

compared to the waiting list for nhs physio, this seems ideal.

good luck

carole x

My physio isn’t a neurophysio, he is the Occupational Health physio at work. I’m lucky that he has previous experience working with MS patients, but the main reason for me seeing him in the first place was that I didn’t have to wait for referral to go through (if I had, I’d still be waiting to see someone!).

He clearly knows about MS as the exercises hw has given me are already having results and I’ve only been doing them 2 months. I am walking better than I was and I am using my walking stick less.

I am lucky to have ready access to a physio with relevant experience. I just wish there were more physios out there so that everyone who is recommended to see one can do so promptly and as often as necessary.

Hi - I started pilates about 2 months ago. I find this is really good as it is mainly about stretching its not high impact etc. I told the instructor about my ms and he helps me to do what i can but not to over do it.

I really feel like it has improved my core strength - I dont fall over half as much now, not sure thats connected…

good luck

x

My mentor is Mr Motivator; all right may look a right **** but he’s a real gent and knows his onions. See http://www.mstrust.org.uk/information/publications/moveit.jsp

G

My walking isn’t great these days, but things where all your legs have to do is to push downwards rather than lift up - exercise bike/indoor ski-er - are fine, so I get my cardio exercise that way when I’m well enough to do it, which is usually, fingers crossed. A while back, the neuro-physio taught me Pilates-type exercises to strengthen the core muscles and help with core stability, and I do these and some stretching exercises at home most days (not working any more, the one thing I’m not short of is time!). I would be reasonably fit if there weren’t so many important bits of me that are completely knackered.

Alison

The Sally Gunnell exercises on this site are good for starters. I have been waiting since July for approval of my P.I.P. so had to cut down on the weekly heated pool and yoga at the local MS centre, not enough money in the kitty.

I have bought a Swiss ball, on the recommendation of the MS physio, and even sitting on it whilst watching tele helps to improve my core balance. I have found some basic pilates excercises using the Swiss Ball on the internet and am trying to manage at least one twenty minute session a day.

Another thing that helps for me is slowly walking backwards. I started this up and down the kitchen, using the work top to support me. I know I must be confusing the locals now, as I try to manage about half a mile backwards then forwards on the esplanade at the beach, (weather permitting) Mostly people give me a wind berth, thinking perhaps I am a little crazy, but many are very friendly and intrigued as to why I do it. If I do the backwards first, I find I am much less wobbly on the forward return journey.

Everybody can find their own level, but the most important thing is to try. Surprisingly after about 20 minutes to half an hour of excerise, I feel less stressed and tired than before I started.

Good luck

Mary