Forum

Bobath in neurological rehabilitation

Date: 27 November 2011 10:16

Hi all!

I have been diagnosed with MS in 2004. I am presently suffering from quads weakness and I cannot do stairs anymore. The right leg is spastic and the foot cannot be controlled without undue efforts.

 I was wondering if any of you have had Bobath neurorehabilitation and have had any positive results...?

I imagine that people suffering from strokes also have similar symptoms.

I am also interested in how they managed to get walking again...if possible without any supports...

Thanks & Regards

Bryan

 

Hi Bryan,

 

Ive always thought through repetitive exercise a retraining of the pathways giving messages to the limbs might be possible.  When I first got diagnosed my legs wouldnt move very well so I used the theory that if I pushed myself round and round in circles in my garden (grass surrounding should I fall which I did on more than one ocassion) I would teach my message centre to find alternative routes.  My neuro is also interested in such facts as shes seen children relearn to function again after neurological loss, the brain being more placid.  It was thought years ago adults brains were already structured in such a way making it hard to reroute however Im a firm believer that indeed unless we try how do we know, as each individual is just that.

 

We often find ways to do things in other ways, compensatory, however Bobath suggests we dont go down that route.  I do use compensatory yet at the same time repetitive motions is good for the muscle conduction and strengthening of the affected bone structure, so as and when signals are rerouted all is in the best possible condition for uptake.  Id say why not until remyalination of the affected nerve structures are achieveable.

 

I wish you well in your quest, keep us informed of progress.

 

bren

 

Bryan,

        l have to admit l had not heard of 'Bobath' neurorehability. l have just googled it - and they do say it is helpful for pwms. l have great

difficulty in walking -and need to hold onto furniture around the house - and use my scooter to get out and about. But l do realise l need to exercise regularly. l have a 'eliptical trainer' and a Health Rider plus a Power-plate. l have just done about 15mins on the eliptical trainer -

l could hardly stand when l first got on to it - but the machine does hold me in an up-right position - and works legs and arms at the same time.

When on it - l feel so much better - the feeling of looking 'normal' and stepping away - ignoring the pain and discomfort - which soon goes away. lts very exhilerating - and l find that when l get off the machine my legs seem to 'remember' what they should be doing.   l have also used and old slender-tone machine - strapping the bands around my legs in different positions and placing the pads so they get my muscles working and my drop-foot lifting up. A sports therapist showed me how to do it. Somehow the body does remember - with the right stimulation

how it should be working. l know its not for long - but you have to keep at it.

F.

In principle, I think Bobath rehabilitation's great and worth going for, if you can.

 

I'm a great believer in mirror neurons (even though the original 20th century theories have been tweaked somewhat) and in the body's ability to rebuild neural pathways through repetitive exercise and (if possible) by visualising and/or watching yourself doing the right thing.

 

MS will do what MS does, but there's a lot we can do to slow it down by looking after our poor bodies - and exercise is one of them.

 

Absolutely fascinated to hear what Campion has to say about giving muscles a boost with slendertone pads. Obviously, being able to exercise them yourself is the best, but that sounds like the next best thing...

 

Lolli xx

[quote=“Lollipop”]

In principle, I think Bobath rehabilitation’s great and worth going for, if you can.

I’m a great believer in mirror neurons (even though the original 20th century theories have been tweaked somewhat) and in the body’s ability to rebuild neural pathways through repetitive exercise and (if possible) by visualising and/or watching yourself doing the right thing.

MS will do what MS does, but there’s a lot we can do to slow it down by looking after our poor bodies - and exercise is one of them.

Absolutely fascinated to hear what Campion has to say about giving muscles a boost with slendertone pads. Obviously, being able to exercise them yourself is the best, but that sounds like the next best thing…

Lolli xx

[/quote] Lolli,

lf you place the slendertone pads in the same positions as you would a FES - it will work the foot/ankle. l have struggled for nearly 30yrs now to keep as fit as possible. But having to drag and lift my left side all the time has taken its toll on my right-side - which is not effected by the ms. Now l have osteo-arthritis in hip/knee/ankle - so not a good leg to stand on. l have also tried acupuncture - and after treatment l find l can move my toes and foot on my left leg as normal - but it only lasts for a couple of hours. lts very strange - but at least you know that the movement has not gone completely.