Forum

Arm bracelets for MS support and alert

Hello,

My name is ALexandra Corina, I’m new in this forum and for me it’s the first time when i’m using this site. A very loved person of mine has this MS and i what to found a bracelet for her with the message Alert for MS and with the sign for this illness. Also i would like to wear one to see that i will support her without any conditions. This bracelet is with Support for MS and also with the sign for the illness. Can someone help me to see if i will find this bracelets?

The trouble is that MS is so different from person to person. A medic alert bracelet would actually be useless. It would not really alert anyone to anything specific. People with certain conditions (allergy to penicillin for example) would benefit from having Drs etc know in an emergency but MS is not like that. My MS is probably totally different to your friend so what help would a bracelet be? I can’t think that even if I was unconscious and unable to tell people, any emergency medical intervention would be different because I have MS.

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there were small cards available at ms life.

these said "i have ms and…

may need to use the toilet urgently

may need to rest

may be unable to speak"

there were quite a few more things on it.

the need to use the toilet urgently is a universally recognised symptom so if it means that i wouldnt have to talk about my ms in a store, just show the card and be shown to the nearest loo that would be great.

all the points on it were things i can relate to.

sometimes there’s no shutting me up but if i’m really fatigued i just can’t speak.

to be honest, i thought these are good points for PIP applications.

carole x

Saw this post, and thought exactly the same as you, Wendels.

Decided to wait and see what anybody else thought. MS is a chronic condition, but only very rarely a medical emergency. It’s not a case of you must/must NOT be given certain drugs to stay alive.

I’d be curious to know what the friend thinks about such a bracelet, and whether they would wear it! I personally have no wish to advertise to others that I have anything serious the matter with me, by wearing a medical alert bracelet. Especially when, as you say, it would make absolutely no difference to my care if I suffered a sudden unrelated health emergency, such as an accident or heart attack. I need the same care as anyone else in those circumstances.

Mind you, when I had to have a CT scan after a bump on the head (traffic accident), I did have to warn staff: “It might not look quite normal anyway - I have MS.” I had to trust they’d be able to tell the difference between an MS lesion and a new bleed.

I’m not sure MS lesions show up all that well on a CT scan anyway. All I learnt was my scan had been “OK”. As it was A&E and they were run ragged, I didn’t have the opportunity to ask whether that meant: “OK” as in: “We didn’t see ANY anomaly”, or just: “We didn’t see anything that isn’t fully explained by your MS”.

Tina

actually, I think a rubber bracelet saying Ms on it could be really useful. Doing so many stupid things: staggering walk, forget things, leave things, walk into shops with no dea what I needed to buy…often think people must realise there is something wrong with me…!

Tina and Wendels

I agree with what you have both said about the relative unimportance of MS in a medical emergency situation, but have one comment - that of medication.

A while ago now I rushed into A&E with agonising abdominal pain and fever: I was seriously ill. It was touch and go, and I received emergency surgery which saved my life … just in time! Now, MS was irrelevant to my condition, however, I am on medication, and the doctors and anaesthetist needed the details of that, which fortunately I was able to give shortly before I became delirious and had to be knocked out with morphine. I don’t think I’m on anything that interfered, but I’m very happy that the docs had the information. (I’d gone there alone, so no-one else to tell them).

I now carry a card with my drug details, and more, in my wallet - which is always with me when I’m out and about, and keep details in the house which will be found in case of any future emergency (see below). The docs need all the facts if they are to do the best they can.

I use the Lions Club - ‘Message in a Bottle’ scheme. I am not a member of this club, you don’t have to be, but I think it makes good sense. I have a sticker on the door and another on the fridge. The emergency services know about this scheme, and seeing a sticker will look in the fridge where said ‘Message in (plastic) Bottle’ is stored. They would then know exactly what medication I was on (I may be alone again).

Ben

http://www.lions105ea.com/specialist_officer/miab.html

we seem to have reached a consensus.

knowing we have ms won’t be that much help in a medical emergency,

however knowing we have ms can help people understand what is wrong with us.

it may make life a bit easier for us.

carole x

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Yes Carol, I agree and think the little card you speak of in message #5 may be useful to some of us.

It’s a personal decision really.

I am happy to carry a card which lists my medication.

Ben

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Hello, i think you understood me wrong. I’m looking for something as Gingerlil told in her comment. I want to find a bracelet that everyone who knows the sign will recognize an person who is ill thank you

Alexandra

You can get them from etsy.com;

xx

Ahh…perfect, thank you cert much

thank you very much

I was interested to read these responses. I do wear a medic alert bracelet on the advice of an anaesthetist who after a major operation some years go told me my trachea was difficult to incubate. This was about ten years before my diagnosis of MS. He went on to add that in the case of planned surgery it would not be a problem because I could mention it, but should I be unconscious it might well be the difference between life and death.

interestingly when I was diagnosed I informed medic alert and my record shows “anaesthetic risk, difficult intubation. Reason MS” which leads me to believe the two are connected.

the bracelet reads MS anaesthetic risk difficult intubation and gives a tel no for further info.

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It never ceases to amaze me how much common sense, valuable information I recieve just reading these forums

Jan x

well actually was thinking of something else, not a piece of jewellery, but but simply an orange rubber band…maybe it exists already (?), but can’t find it…

There are some limited edition rubber wristband ( small sizes only left) on www.ms-uk.org They are black with a chrome bar with the letters MS slogan on one side and white lettering, ‘making solutions’ on the reverse. £5

xx

Hi - I got mine from the idbandco.com