Forum

taxis

Hi, i wonder what other people`s experiences are re taxis.

Only once have I used a taxi in my home town. The white cabs line up in a road in town, with disabled signs on their doors. I approached one who said he couldnt take me as my chair is electric. Another 2 said the same. Then a 3rd had some initiative and radioed for another taxi to come.

But getting into this one was difficult. I had to duck as I went up the ramp, or I may have been decapitated! Then I wasnt anchored down and had to keep my fingers crossed for a safe journey…it was!

In May we went to Blackpool for a few days…the same thing happened.

Now we are going on jollies this Sat and wonder what`ll happen if I want a taxi again.

I know it`s not like me, not to have researched the topic, but does anyone have any ideas how we are supposed to use disabled taxis?

pollx

Hi Poll,

I am not visibly disabled, so my problems are not the same as yours. However, it brings its own problems.

The taxi rank at Bristol Parkway station is - like all taxi ranks, I guess - a queuing system. Sometimes the drivers have queued many hours, in the hope of getting a lucrative long-distance fare (e.g. to the airport). BUT, it’s luck of the draw - and that is their choice.

The only trouble is, if the driver has waited ages, he gets resentful if the passenger only wants to go round the block, as I usually do (my house is probably only about five minutes away, by car).

So I get sarky comments, like: “You could walk that! Woss the matter with your legs?” Or: “Why don’t you get the bus?” (Yeah, just what I need after a long and tiring journey - to have to stand in the cold for the bus, and then a walk at the other end - with my suitcase!)

They still charge a minimum of £5, even for a five-minute journey - or the equivalent of £60 an hour, which is more than my hourly rate has ever been, my entire working life!

So I reckon they’ve got a cheek to moan about the short “bread-and-butter” fares, especially when they know the luck element is part of the job, and you win some, you lose some. It’s not fair to take it out on the passenger, because they’re greedy for a 50 quid fare, but only got a fiver! There are not many places (outside the sex industry, I’m guessing), where you can still get a fiver for two hours sat reading the paper, followed by five minutes work!

But it makes me nervous about getting a taxi from there, because I’m worried I’m going to get nasty comments, just because I don’t want to go very far. I’m not sure they should be in that line of work, if they can’t accept that as a normal part of the job. I’m sure it all averages out in the end, and that all the drivers are sometimes lucky, sometimes unlucky. If you can’t live with that, why be a taxi-driver, and have a go at the poor passenger?

Tina

x

Hi Poll

I use the black and white taxis in Leeds a fair bit, but when I do, I tend to be in my manual wheelchair as I use the buses with my electric wheelchair.

I have found them to be good, the ones where access is via the boot tend to be the best as you don’t have to duck and you get well fastened in! Not sure about the ones in Halifax but the ones with side-entry are probably best for easier to position manual wheelchairs. If i was you I would make a bee-line for the rear entry ones.

I am really surprised you were not anchored down , there have been times when I have told them not to bother(in a rush and I can hang on ok) and they have insisted, health and safety etc in case there is an accident.

Sorry can’t be of much help but sure you will find a cab that suits and once you do you can always head for that type.7

Happy hols

Hi Poll

I use the black and white taxis in Leeds a fair bit, but when I do, I tend to be in my manual wheelchair as I use the buses with my electric wheelchair.

I have found them to be good, the ones where access is via the boot tend to be the best as you don’t have to duck and you get well fastened in! Not sure about the ones in Halifax but the ones with side-entry are probably best for easier to position manual wheelchairs. If i was you I would make a bee-line for the rear entry ones.

I am really surprised you were not anchored down , there have been times when I have told them not to bother(in a rush and I can hang on ok) and they have insisted, health and safety etc in case there is an accident.

Sorry can’t be of much help but sure you will find a cab that suits and once you do you can always head for that type.7

Happy hols

Hi Poll,I have nothing but praise for the Hack and E7 drivers on the Wirral.I’ve gone from a manual wheelchair, a class III buggy to a titchy four wheel scooter to a powerchair in about two years and the Lads who know me treat me the same,have a banter+crack and always get a healthy tip.I’m generous with Government money.

Wb x

hi poll

when i was first diagnosed i had voluntarily relinquished my license so didnt have a motability car.

i used my local taxi firm quite a lot, all short journeys but i tipped them well.

then i needed to get into manchester and didnt fancy public transport so i rang my local firm and they were brilliant, only charging me £20 when i knew from experience that most taxis would have charged £30 or more.

they were quite sad when i got a motability car!

so i would suggest befriending a local firm and ringing them instead of joining the queue at the taxi rank

carole x

Hi Poll,

I use the black and whites in Leeds regularly. When I ring up and ask for a wheelchair accessible vehicle they usually ask if it’s manual or electric and then send an appropriate car. I don’t usually have to wait too long when I’m at my daughter’s near town but it sometimes takes a bit longer out here to Otley so I book ahead if I can.

I’ve never used a taxi rank. My advice would be to repair to a café and call up the firm. They can usually give a pretty accurate idea of how long they’ll be so you can get yourself to the kerb to wait in time and you will get an appropriate car. I’ve got a mid sized electric chair but have always been able to get in.

The minicab firms, even if they have accessible cars are not much use because they are often unavailable so I stick to the black and whites.

Like Schoey23 I prefer the rear access ones because the ramps are less steep. Going in from the side you have to give it some welly and remember to duck! I hate coming down the ramps because I’m rubbish at driving backwards!

Like all things wheelchair it’s a challenge! But it gets easier with practice.

Enjoy your hols

Jane

Thanks all…some really good tips there, from personal experience…the best type of advice!

We`ll see what happens when we go on our jollies. There are buses which go right into the holiday park and are wheelchair friendly, so I am hoping that will go well for our trips to Scarborough, Filey and maybe Bridlington too!

luv Pollx