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Move to a sunny country?

Has anyone moved/thought about moving to a sunnier country? Did it make any difference to your MS?

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only in my dreams

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Only in Mr Sssues dreams. I have utterly refused. However nice it can be to go on holiday, I like living here. Where I can speak the language, don’t have to wear factor 40 sun cream (thus negating the point of getting more vitamin D), and don’t have the utter fatigue brought on by too much heat.

But I’m sure there are people who can deal with hot weather and manage to get the benefits of hot country life.

Sue

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It would depend entirely on a Free at the Point of Entry of the health service.

In most other parts of the world I’d well and truly *********** !

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isle of wight could be a good spot

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I’ll let someone else answer that.

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Personally, I prefer the green, green grass of home. Come rain or shine, there’s no place like home. I don’t think my MS will improve overnight in somewhere warm, however, I am not raining on anyone’s parade if that’s what they want to do. As for the IOW, I do believe the time has come Mr D, we really need to get back to the matter in hand…xx

Isle of Durer. Oh yes please. Can we talk about that again, now it’s nearly time for the knitted swimsuits to come out?? (Not mankinis please AD!)

Sue

Last time I went somewhere sunny with my daughter by the time I had finished applying sun cream to us both I needed a lie down! Just the idea of having to do that every day exhausts me!

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It must be that time Sue, if we don’t do something soon, we will find it overpopulated & no room for the distillery, unthinkable. I would even put up with mankini’s, long as a certain person was sitting down, with a kagoul on, wellies & a full tog duvet, only showing hands & head, otherwise I’m ready to go xxx

If you can’t make it here, you ain`t gonna make it elsewhere.

If you want to live in the 1950s.

My wife wouldn’t want to go anywhere hot, she’s become more or less intolerant of any heat since the MS got a grip, she doesn’t like the cold much either, as long as it’s about 16° or 17°C she’s OK, but she can also be seen flinging off all her clothes when it’s 10° or wearing gloves, scarf, woolly hat and three extra fleeces when it’s 22°.

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Suggest before you make any enormous decisions, try a couple of weeks or so in whichever country you’re thinking of. Bearing in mind that most hotels have air conditioning and a private house/flat rented or otherwise probably won’t. As the saying goes"Suck it and see".

Good luck

Tippy x

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I have a cheap little house in Spain and before my wife got MS i would have liked to think i might have been able to stop work when i got to about 60 and we could scrape by living there until we got our government pensions.I don’t think that’s likely to be practical now!

When we are there and the weather is slightly warm it does seem my wife is slightly better but i don’t think we would even try and brave August time now as it is usually too hot and although the winter is short the weather does seem to have changed in recent years with a lot of cold,damp,and even snow. I think in winter rather than an old stone house without heating we are better here in a modern relatively well insulated and central heated house.Then you have the NHS and prescriptions etc i expect having to buy at full cost anything she needed is likely to be very expensive.

However we are off there in about a week and hopefully we shall have a very nice relaxing time and continue to allow ourselves the pleasure of that dream future even if it ain’t going to happen!

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Romantic dreams of living in a stone cottage with lovely weather all the time sound great in theory, but it’s much more comfortable living in a house with central heating in the winter rather than log fires and air conditioning for the summer.

And as for trying to live with MS without the NHS, forget it. I would cost a fortune in various NHS provided drugs, catheters, stoma supplies, doctors, nurses, etc, etc.

This is why the Isle of Durer appeals, staying part of the U.K. and it’s often bemoaned, but actually often pretty good (imo) NHS.

Sue

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The sun would only get you down after a bit, like working in a chocolate factory, too much & you’ll be sick of it. Mind you, a day or so here would be much appreciated, I know it’s yellow, but the memory is fading…

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We moved from the UK to Pune, India. Not for the sunshine! Though it is wonderful to wake up to sunny blue skies most days. It lifts the spirits

2.5 months of thE year the weather is unbearable. Time to hibernate but when an outing is necessary, cold water sprays and lots of iced water keep the body temperature down. Then come the monsoons. Everything comes alive!

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Thanks for all your comments. Good info and gave me a laugh. I think I’ll start with a decent holiday and see if that’s sufficient. I work too long because I think I’ve got to get cash and pension sorted so I can retire early (due to their bloomin MS). But really I should be living my life now especially as I’m reasonably able bodied.

I live in France where the health care is brillant, where i live it doesn’t get too hot thank god because i suffer more in heat than when its cold.

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From my own experience I would say just try it. After all, it doesn’t have to be permanent. Where we are, on the Côte d’Azur, yes, it can get hot in July and August but that’s always a good time for going back and visiting family in UK! We get about 300 days a year of sun here and whilst the heat affects my MS it’s not too bad and we use the air-con as and when necessary. Having so many sunny days really lifts the spirits. Right now, it suits us to be here but like I say, never say never. Healthcare is definitely better here too in all ways.

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