Forum

mobility scooters

Hiya all,

Can anyone give me any advice, concerning mobility scooters ?

I’ve been using a small Freerider scooter for the past several years, I mainly use it on my allotment which I’ve adapted with raised beds, however although useful, it’s uncomfortable for any prolonged lenth of time.

I like to spend most of spring and summer months pottering on my plot, I want to buy a better scootter with a higher seat and handle bars,I’m 5’6" about 12stone.

Before I spend any money and hear the sales pitches I would like any sugestions/recommendations.

Thanks

Showers

Hello

I have a Travelscoot. It weighs in at 18Kg, has a dry cell battery that recharges in a maximum of 6 hours. Folds up to the size of a large golf bag. No reverse gear but it does have a very tight turning circle. As it is a three wheeler you do need to be mobile and it takes a wee while to learn to drive.

Costs about £1200 or Euro 1500 after taking off VAT.

Simple servicing and maintenance can be done at a bike shop.

I think it is good value for money, it is practical, sturdy, ingenious and well built but it is a little bit on the primitive side but that makes it fun to ride. You do not feel as if you are disabled on one of these.

Everyone I know has been impressed by it - clever bit of kit.

Go to my website and search on Travelscoot, there is even a Youtube film.

Good luck,

Patrick

The previous reply wouldn’t be advertising would it? My initial knee jerk (megalol) reaction is that for £1200 I don’t want anything remotely primitive,and since when can bike shops sort out electronic problems.Three wheels means stability issues, but not being able to go backwards is really backwards. Buyer beware,

Wb

Hello,

It is not advertising and no commission eithert.

I’m just just giving a warts and all review. I happen to think its excellent value foir money. Lightest mobility scooter on the market, excellent value for money and nothing electronic that can go wrong.

Suggest you read reviews on my website and look at Youtube.

Patrick

www.asid4disabled

Woblyboy,

I know Patrick (we are both members of the West Herts MS Society branch) and his website which is worth looking at so why not give it a visit and share your views with forum users about what you find.

Patrick has no commercial interest in Travelscoot or the company that supplies it. So definately his original post was not an advert.

I am happy to concede that Travelscoot would not be for everyone and the supplier (as well as Patrick) is very upfront about.

However, one thing I would correct is his comment about ‘nothing electronic that can go wrong’. The speed control is electronic with a twist grip handle bar speed controller and the electronics are built into the motor.

Lightness and portability is the main aim of this scooter. To achieve this the designer has distilled the scooter to its essence.

Your are right. It would not suit everyone and anyone considering a purchase should try one first to see if it fitted their requirements.

For example reading between the lines of Showers needs it probably would not. It really depends on his mobility, how good the allotment paths are, and whether he intends using it in the rain.

However, it meets my needs well for airline travel and generally getting about. For my uses I’m happy to trade off the stability of a three wheel ‘trike’ and lack of a reverse gear for the mobility it has given me.

Hope this helps.

Nimrod

PS Patrick allowed me to give his a test run before I purchased my own. Try before you buy. N:o)

I often visit Patrick’s site… full of good info and well worth a look.

Pat x

Hello,

There is going to be a Mark II of the Travelscoot. I had to write to him about something quite different, this is his reply.

"Yes, snow and mud is bad for the belt. In about 3-4 months a new version of the scooter will be available. It will have a rim motor (built inside the wheel) and the belt is eliminated. Also it will have a reverse function and much better brakes."

I think this will be a big improvement. On mark I the brakes are not brilliant and the scooter does not like going ‘off piste’.

Watch this space for more information

Patrick

lt might be worth going to a ‘shopmobility centre’ and trying out their machines. And the volunteers there will be able to advise you on the stability and any problems any of the scooters might have. Also, it is a good place to look to buy a secondhand scooter - as they usually have private adverts for scooters for sale.

l have had several brilliant second hand scooters over the past 25yrs. So many are bought then hardly used. Pride is a good reliable make - so is TGA. For use on an allotment you will be better off with something sturdy with a good comfy seat with arms - and certainly reverse function.

l bought a rollator that Patrick recommended - its made for outdoor use. Topro Olympus. lt has a large strong bag for carrying things and a good seat so that you can sit and work in the garden. lt made it possible for me to get down to my hens/ducks with a watering can -in the bag - and also allowed me to pick runner beans etc. l have even used it in the snow. l like the way it supports me and gives me the option of sitting down when l need to. l was also using it indoors - in the summer - but then with the wet weather and mud on the wheels l have to leave it in the leanto - and l have bought another cheaper one for using in the house - lt has a seat and a tray - so l can carry a plate of food or cup of coffee on it. But its the way these rollators hold you up - and allow you to walk rather then previously l would be dragging myself about holding onto furniture or a stick and not upright and walking ‘tall’.

The most l have paid for a secondhand scooter was £400 - As long as the batteries are in good order - there is not a lot that can go wrong. l have - in the past worn the wheels out with the sort of use l give them.

l have had a Tramper for many years - and l certainly give it a hard life - several miles a day off road.

F

[quote=“Campion”]

lt might be worth going to a ‘shopmobility centre’ and trying out their machines. [/quote]

What a great idea and well worth folowing up.

N:o)

I have taken a big interest in mobility scooters these last two years (does not seem that many years ago I was comparing motor bikes but that is for another forum) anyway when I saw that someone was enthusing about a new one to me, I could not wait to see what I had missed.

What a disapointment, I looked at it then I looked again to see if I had the right one. I have been using a scooter myself for the last two years and I have also been involved with helping other people choose the right one for them, so was rather lost for words when I see that it was suggested as an option to someone who wanted to use one on an allotment.

No one would be safe using this scooter on an allotment, the nature of its design alone makes it unstable for use on any surface other than on a a very good level surface, an airport would be ok ( I would hesitate to use it even in my new shower room.

On cheking out just a few adverts for them I see that they are advetised as the lightest and best mobility scooter, it may be the lightest but what are they measuring it agains when they say best?.

Also £ for £ the Mobie or the Luggie are both a much better option, not much heavier and a whole lot more stable, factor in that a lot of people with ms have balance issues and it is a no brainer.

Hi, for an allotment which I imagine could get a bit muddy and bumpy, a Travelscot won’t do the job and it really won’t work for comfort either. I am a big fan of my Luggie but even so the seat is fairly hard and I find I get a numb bum if I am in it for too long. I use a sheep skin on the seat to ease that area

If transporting it to the allotment isn’t an issue and you can scoot from home down there and aren’t needing to put it in a car to get there you might be better off looking at one of the bigger scooters for this purpose.

I also have my big outdoor scooter as my Luggie is not rugged enough to deal with getting bogged in mud etc. I have an Invacare Comet which is super comfy with a big padded Capatain’s chair for a seat, big wheels that I defy to get bogged and is rugged and very stable. It is also roomy enough to carry equipment, potted plants, a watering can, etc etc

http://www.invacare.com.au/index.cfm/1,93,1145,40,html/Invacare-Comet-Heavy-Duty

B

The scooters are most popular now a days .Instead of driving cars many people prefer to drive a scooter.I think Vortex super sport 50cc scooter is better for you.

I am another recent owner of aTravelscoot - the new model with reverse gear and band brakes.

I looked at mobility buggies but couldn’t face the prospect of a Wimpy Bar seat mounted on a breeze block atop a set of roller-skate wheels, with a shopping bag dangling behind the back. People fret about reaching the age of investing in anti-wrinkle cream, but one of those things is guaranteed to add at least 25 years. More to the point, they are too heavy to lift from the pavement up to our front path, then up again to the front door.

And I work for advertising agencies. Whilst one of the least cool people you will meet, one has to maintain certain credibility - whizzing in on the Travelscoot is going to be better than shuffling in with my walking stick as it is seriously neat - to the point where one bus driver told me off saying only wheelchairs and mobility aids are allowed on buses, not three-wheeled scooters, and they should go up the ramp not be lifted in at the front door and pushed down the aisle. He proved to a lone misery-guts - others say how useful it is not to have to add to journey times by putting down the ramp.

The day it was delivered I bet my husband 50p that the first person to ride it would be less than 4’9” tall. On cue, boy2 walked in, his eyes lit up and he said, ‘Can I have a go?’ He and boy3 spent the afternoon going up, down and round the living room. At the market my 10yr old niece commandeers it to do quick circuits of the vegetable stalls.

I had been stuck indoors for months and had to get the children to go out buy milk, post letters and things you would not drive to. This means I can go to the park or nip down to the shops again, and get round inside the shops when I get there. I had gone to places to John Lewis and had to give up before the end of the shopping list because I couldn’t walk around the shop any more.

My husband described it neatly as being able to go anywhere that you can take a pram – what I can’t do are flights of stairs. But then neither could Daleks and they did pretty well in terms of intergalactic domination. I’ll be fine as long as I don’t meet anyone with a sonic screwdriver.

Hello Amy

Is there any danger of it tipping over when turning corners…I thought I had read this on a review.

Can you also tell me, is the seat comfy. I’m only slim…size 12!! my bums not small though…family inheritance

I’m giving serious thought to buying one of these. I have trouble with my balance and use a stick and I get tired pretty quickly when out walking…which I love to do. I also have Psoriatic arthritis, so I think that probabbly adds to the tiredness.

Lastly, whats the cost please?

Sorry for all the questions xxx

Hello Blossom,

I’ve had a Travelscoot for over two years, I think it is a mobiity scooter that does not make you feel disabled. You do need to learn to be aware of the terraine, is the camber the wrong way round when going round a corner, is there a small ridge? After a couple of hours you will be fine.

The seat is plenty big enough but not to sit on for hours and hours.

I have had no regrets since I bought one - gven me my independence when I had to stop driving

Buy it in Germany or USA. Speak to the people directly via their website travelscoot.eu or travelscoot.com

Good luck,

Patrick

To answer your questions:

If you go round a corner too fast on anything with wheels, you lean inwards to counteract centrifugal force or it will try to tip over - think of the difference between going round a corner on a two-wheel bicycle vs. a tricycle, or of a car that doesn’t brake sufficiently or a supermarket trolley pushed by a too-enthusiastic shopper. You slow down instinctively.

You also learn cross transverse slopes, where the ground is higher on one side than the other. It is the difference between walking or riding a bicycle across a slope vs. pushing a baby buggy, which tilts at the same angle as the ground and tries to turn and go downhill. You swiftly learn to follow the advice on the Travelscoot web site always to go straight up or straight down a slope, which means travelling two sides of a triangle when going up a dropped kerb - straight up from the road then sharp left/right having reached the top - rather than following the desire-line you would take as a pedestrian, covering the shortest distance via the diagonal route.

If you do find yourself on a cross-ways slope and feeling like one of the back wheels is going to lift off the ground you automatically put your foot out to the ground, which is always within reach - unlike what appears to be the case with some mobility scooters where you sit higher.

The seat is fine, much like a dining room chair with a padded seat (as opposed to a kitchen chair). If necessary to add more padding, my Heath Robinson approach would be to get a piece of sheep’s fleece, such as sold for lining baby buggy seats, cut it to the right size and fasten it with pieces of elastic underneath, like the strings that keep an ironing board cover in place. However, I found blogs by breathtakingly fat American ‘women of size’ who appear to adore the Travelscoot and do not refer to needing to add anything to the seat. The Travelscoot is designed to carry someone weighing up to 22 stones; I presume the seat padding is designed to cope!

On cost, I ordered the more expensive version with the better, lighter weight battery. You sign a declaration to be exempt from VAT on grounds of disability and the total bill came to about £1,600.

I bought the basket, which is jolly useful on the front to throw in your handbag, folding walking stick and other things you would otherwise be carrying. I have also taken the Rixen Kaul basket from the front of my now-abandoned electric bicycle, which is much bigger, and attached it to the seat post so that it sits behind the Travelscoot seat; it hangs below the seat so it will not raise one’s centre of gravity when filled with several kilos of vegetables, but the Klickfix mechanism of the basket bracket means the basket is detachable - it does not have to be unloaded to get the shopping indoors and is not in the way when needing to charge the battery.

The problem is finding one to try out before buying it, because there are no showrooms offering test drives. Ditto, you never see it advertised - awareness seems to travel by word of mouth; it is the marketing person’s dream (I know, I am one!). I discovered it when I saw one used around the local farmers’ market - the lady owner turned out to live a couple of streets away and let me have a go. From where we live in Dartmouth Park everywhere is either up or down. If anyone is in London or within striking distance I am happy to let you pootle off across Hampstead Heath for an hour or so - it goes up Parliament Hill quite happily.

To answer your questions:

If you go round a corner too fast on anything with wheels, you lean inwards to counteract centrifugal force or it will try to tip over - think of the difference between going round a corner on a two-wheel bicycle vs. a tricycle, or of a car that doesn’t brake sufficiently or a supermarket trolley pushed by a too-enthusiastic shopper. You slow down instinctively.

You also learn cross transverse slopes, where the ground is higher on one side than the other. It is the difference between walking or riding a bicycle across a slope vs. pushing a baby buggy, which tilts at the same angle as the ground and tries to turn and go downhill. You swiftly learn to follow the advice on the Travelscoot web site always to go straight up or straight down a slope, which means travelling two sides of a triangle when going up a dropped kerb - straight up from the road then sharp left/right having reached the top - rather than following the desire-line you would take as a pedestrian, covering the shortest distance via the diagonal route.

If you do find yourself on a cross-ways slope and feeling like one of the back wheels is going to lift off the ground you automatically put your foot out to the ground, which is always within reach - unlike what appears to be the case with some mobility scooters where you sit higher.

The seat is fine, much like a dining room chair with a padded seat (as opposed to a kitchen chair). If necessary to add more padding, my Heath Robinson approach would be to get a piece of sheep’s fleece, such as sold for lining baby buggy seats, cut it to the right size and fasten it with pieces of elastic underneath, like the strings that keep an ironing board cover in place. However, I found blogs by breathtakingly fat American ‘women of size’ who appear to adore the Travelscoot and do not refer to needing to add anything to the seat. The Travelscoot is designed to carry someone weighing up to 22 stones; I presume the seat padding is designed to cope!

On cost, I ordered the more expensive version with the better, lighter weight battery. You sign a declaration to be exempt from VAT on grounds of disability and the total bill came to about £1,600.

I bought the basket, which is jolly useful on the front to throw in your handbag, folding walking stick and other things you would otherwise be carrying. I have also taken the Rixen Kaul basket from the front of my now-abandoned electric bicycle, which is much bigger, and attached it to the seat post so that it sits behind the Travelscoot seat; it hangs below the seat so it will not raise one’s centre of gravity when filled with several kilos of vegetables, but the Klickfix mechanism of the basket bracket means the basket is detachable - it does not have to be unloaded to get the shopping indoors and is not in the way when needing to charge the battery.

The problem is finding one to try out before buying it, because there are no showrooms offering test drives. Ditto, you never see it advertised - awareness seems to travel by word of mouth; it is the marketing person’s dream (I know, I am one!). I discovered it when I saw one used around the local farmers’ market - the lady owner turned out to live a couple of streets away and let me have a go. From where we live in Dartmouth Park everywhere is either up or down. If anyone is in London or within striking distance I am happy to let you pootle off across Hampstead Heath for an hour or so - it goes up Parliament Hill quite happily.

Hello again,

The red sling that fits between the A-Frame is very useful for shopping

Patrick

Hello Amy

Thank you so much for your informative reply…very much appreciated.

I’m even more keen to buy one now. I have good upper body strength, so think I could handle it quite well.

I live in yorkshire…not sure I will be able to try one out.

After what you’ve said about the seat, I’m happy it will accomodate my J-Lo bum

Thanks again xxx

Glad you found the info useful.

Incidentally, Which? are doing a report on mobility buggies to be published in the spring, according to the January issue. I wrote to them suggesting they include the Travelscoot - it not being sold by the usual retailers, I thought they might miss it, and offered to let them borrow mine to test. It will be interesting to see if they do include it and, if so, their verdict. However, if your priorities are lightness and easy portability I wouldn’t wait as everything else is so much heavier and more of a performance to assemble. And if they do review it there will be a flood of orders!