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Worried sick!

Morning one and all. Was wondering if this has happened to anyone else. I was diagnosed August 2013 with rrms and not doing too bad. My cousin had ms for a number of years and passed away a couple of years ago from pneumonia. Now my oldest son 28 started about 2 months ago moaning that when he put his head to his chest a strange feeling in his feet. Then his feet started tingling and then numb. Anyway went to the doctors a couple of weeks ago bloods taken,told the doctor about ms in the family and he was very negative saying that it was not going to be that as its unusual in men. How far do we push for him to have the tests to hopefully rule it out?

Hello

It’s not that uncommon in men. I think it’s something like a 60/40% split between women and men. So more likely in women, but not impossible for a man.

However, just because you have MS, it doesn’t make it very much more likely that your son would too. Have a look at https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/risk-developing-ms it shows the likelihood factors of different family members also developing MS.

That doesn’t mean he / you shouldn’t follow it up, while you having MS isn’t a big factor, it’s still important. It’s completely reasonable that you would see MS type symptoms; meanwhile, doctors prefer you to not suggest diagnoses, but instead to tell them symptoms and let them come up with remedies, referrals and diagnoses.

So in your position, I’d encourage my son to go back to the GP (is there another doctor in the practice?) and ask whether the symptoms sound like a referral to a neurologist is possible and useful. Maybe if the symptoms don’t improve or especially if they get worse, or if he gets anything else which seems relevant.

And try not to worry too much. Being a parent, you’re always going to worry, and chances are, blame yourself. Do try not to, what will be will be. There’s no benefit in driving yourself nuts panicking or feeling responsible. Don’t forget, you’d already had your children when you were diagnosed. Hopefully it’ll get better, or be due to a vitamin deficiency.

Sue