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What should DLA be used for??

Hi,

Sorry if this sounds really ignorant but when is it considered “right” to apply for DLA and what is the money actually for? Do people use it to buy disabilty aids? I have ms and am on a dmd but I don’t know whether I would be wrong to apply for it. I would of course love the extra money but would I be a “fraud” for applying as at the moment my ms is up and down and I don’t know that I would use it for a stairlift or grab handles etc.

Sometimes my legs and arms are very heavy and painful and I find it hard to take normal steps and grip things but other days they feel more normal. Some days I feel very tired but other days I feel brighter. The only things I seem to have regular difficulty with is when I wake up I can’t stand up without my husband helping me to and rather embarrasingly when I have to use the toilet for a number 2 I spend absolutely ages trying to wipe my bottom ( sorry about that ) as I now find it rather difficult to reach around because it really hurts my arm and back. I also find it very hard to do buckles and laces of shoes up because it hurts when I bend down.

But I don’t think this is probably enough to qualify for anything. What does anyone else think?

Thanks.

the care component is paid direct to your carer.

the mobility component is for help in getting around.

i had voluntarily relinquished my driving license but after 2 years i applied for it back and then used my mobility component for a motability car. a fabulous deal tax paid, insurance paid, annual service and MOT paid for. before i had the car i spent my allowance on taxis.

there is another DLA payment which can be used for anything that makes your life easier. i have a cleaner.

have you been seen by an occupational therapist? mine came to the house and made it safe for me to take showers (i got grab rails and a bench seat for over the bath). i was also given a perching stool for use in the kitchen.

i know some people with ms who have applied for direct payments which enable them to pay for a personal assistant to accompant them on outings.

why would you think you’re a fraud? you’ve got ms, an unpleasant and painful disease.

get it applied for and get some advice on filling it in. you have to put the worse case scenario because we all know how up and down ms is. you need higher level mobility in order to get a motability car.

i know there are several people on these boards who know the best people to go to for help with the forms.

why dont you start a new thread “help with filling in the forms to claim DLA”

stop feeling guilty and get cracking with the forms

carole xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

You can use it for anything that makes life easier. Doesn’t have to be disability aids.

I use the mobility component for a car so I can get to work.

The care component - not paid direct to a carer, I haven’t got one - I use for things like a cleaner, occasional gardener, but mostly so I don’t have to work as long hours as i would otherwise.

Information about Disability Living Allowance (DLA)

Who an claim disability living allowance

Disability Living Allowance is a social security benefit that you may be able to claim if you are under 65 and have a long term health problem, mental or physical, that affects your everyday activities.

12 things that won’t affect your Disability Living Allowance claimMany
people, including some doctors, care workers and Department of work and Pensions staff, pass on information and opinions about Disability Living Allowance that aren’t correct. So, no matter what you’ve been told before, here are:

12 things that don’t affect your right to claim Disability Living Allowance.

  1. You’re getting any other benefits - Disability Living Allowance will be paid on top.
  2. You’re working.
  3. Your partner works.
  4. You have savings.
  5. You have not paid any national insurance contributions.
  6. You don’t consider yourself to be disabled - Disability Living Allowance is for people with long term health problems which affect their everyday activities.
  7. You’ve been told by a doctor, nurse, care worker - or anyone other than a welfare rights worker - that you won’t get Disability Living Allowance. Eligibility for Disability Living Allowance is a legal question, not a matter of medical - or any other - opinion.
  8. You live alone and no-one is providing care for you.
  9. You already have someone, a partner for example, providing care for you.
  10. You don’t want anyone to provide care for you.
  11. You’ve been turned down before
  12. You do not want to spend money on personal care: you can spend Disability Living Allowance on anything you wish.

Disability living allowance five minute physical health test for adults

Step one

Look through this list of some (but not all) of the everyday activities that are relevant to DLA:

  • Walking outdoors
  • Walking outdoors alone in unfamiliar places
  • Preparing a cooked main meal for yourself
  • Moving about indoors
  • Taking medication
  • Eating and drinking
  • Staying safe if you’re alone
  • Communicating with other people
  • Getting out of bed in the morning
  • Getting into bed at night
  • Sleeping
  • Using the toilet
  • Washing, having a bath or a shower
  • Looking after your appearance
  • Getting dressed and undressed
  • Social and leisure activities

(Shopping and housework are not generally counted as everyday activities that are relevant to DLA).

Step two

Choose one of the activities above that you have some problems with. For example:

  • you might have problems using the toilet because you have irritable bowel syndrome which causes abdominal pain and urgent diarrhoea, so you sometimes don’t make it in time
  • you might have problems going outdoors alone in unfamiliar places because a visual impairment makes it difficult for you to see obstructions or cross roads safely
  • you may not be able to prepare a cooked main meal for yourself because arthritis in your hands means you can’t peel or chop vegetables.

Step three

With your chosen activity in mind, answer the True or False questions below. If your condition varies, so that the answer is sometimes true and sometimes false, then choose true.

  • I can do it, but it hurts.True or False?
  • I can do it, but only slowly.True or False?
  • I can do it, but only using a special technique of my own.True or False?
  • I can do it, but I need someone with me just in case things go wrong.True or False?
  • It’s not safe for me to do it. True or False?
  • I can’t do it at all. True or False?

Step four

If you haven’t answered True to any of the questions, try the test again with another activity from the list and so on, until you’ve found a statement that is true or decided that there aren’t any.

Step five

If the answer is True to any of the questions in relation to any of the activities listed then you may be entitled to Disability Living Allowance, because they are all reasons why you might ‘reasonably require’ help or supervision, even if you don’t get it or want it.

Whether you are actually eligible for Disability Living Allowance, and at what rate, will depend on how many activities you have problems with and which ones they are.

If the answer wasn’t true to any of the questions it doesn’t mean you are definitely not eligible for Disability Living Allowance, you should try to get help from DIAL http://www.dialuk.info/ who will come around your house and help with the forms. Or Benefits and work http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/ who give excellent advice.

George

There was a thread some time ago where people listed the extra things they had to pay for because of their disability difficulties.

Of course it’s different for everyone but it was a very long list. DLA is supposed to help pay for the things we need to live an ordinary life. But there are no constraints – if you want to spend it down the pub – go for it… George has given a useful post as always and it should help you to decide that you can apply. There is no need to feel guilty about it.

I would just point out that the care component is not paid direct to your carer. There is no requirement to have a carer. The benefit is based on the fact that you “need” the care not that you get it. There are three levels of care component – low, middle and high. If you get middle or high a person who provides 35 hours care to you is eligible to apply for carer’s allowance. This is a benefit that they apply for in their own right.

Jane

Just got mine, it will pay for my hospital parking / extra mileage from work to hospital (I have tysabri so i’m there at least a whole afternoon a month) and to give my dad some petrol money when I get sick and can’t drive anywhere myself. I also tend to go and live with my mum when things get bad, so now I can give her a few bob towards food etc I thoroughly anticipate I will be losing it all come next year and PIPs, and will have to go back to relying on goodwill of parents (divorced but still work together to look after me, bless em). Can’t imagine how I’d manage without them