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Interesting info re fatigue and balance in early MS

This may be of interest to those people who are not too badly affected by walking problems. It seems that a study has found that people in early stage MS who do not have significant walking problems may improve fatigue levels with more therapy based on balance. See Prof Giovanonnis blog: http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.co.uk/2015/10/the-art-of-fatigue-fine-appreciation-of.html?m=1

Interesting, but sadly, I really hate balance exercises.

I suppose it’s human nature that the more trouble you have with something, the less you feel disposed to do it.

In theory, the possibility that you might be able to realise an improvement in fatigue levels should be motivation enough.

But sadly, I find it’s just not an enticing enough carrot to get me regularly doing exercises I find painful and tedious.

I realise that says a lot more about my character, or the lack of it, than the effectiveness of the therapy. But the reality is we’re all human, and it’s damn hard to make yourself keep doing stuff you hate, for a small prospect you may be doing yourself some good.

A particularly frustrating thing I find, with all forms of exercise post MS, is that you do not get fast and measurable results.

I can remember when just a few short weeks of working out would bring about a noticeable change in both physique and performance.

It was wonderful to be able to outrun two (admittedly unfit) male colleagues after just a few weeks’ practice. We’d seen the site shuttle bus. Them (sadly): “Too late, we’ve no chance of catching it.”

Me: “Oh, I think we have!”

Made a run for the bus, caught it, and got the driver to wait for them while they caught up!

Sadly, no such demonstrations of results now. Work and bloody work, but don’t get any damn better. The only “reward” - if you can still call it one - is speculating that you might have been worse if you hadn’t bothered. But that’s not much of a tangible result, really, is it?

Tina

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Interesting indeed. The findings that balance and fatigued are linked are certainly true for me in light of my personal situation. I’m tempted to concentrate on doing exercises which improve balance for the next few months & hope I see an improvement in my fatigue

Hiya

Over the years I have learnt that fatigue, balance & memory tend to go hand in hand for me. If I’m fatigued (not just a bit tired), my balance and memory goes and if my balance goes my fatigue and memory are worse, same for memory. Each thing has an impact on the other and it’s a vicious, chicken and egg circle… which came first?

My Neuro says that as my MS isn’t active (I’m not relapsing) then is must be down to heat, infection, tiredness, depression and the other one I can never remember. I disagree with that as do many others, I have my ups and downs without having any of these issues.

I do regular balance excercises such as Wii fit and beginners Tai Chi (walking up and down in a straight line, head up and moving arms). These do help me but often them help me recognise when my balance is off, then don’t seem to stop the wobbles. Same goes for the brain training type games which are supposed to help with memory etc. The scores tell confirm there is an issue rather than preventing one.

I do think it helps to do all of these thing, nearly 10 years in and I still do them but, I don’t think they prevent anything happening.

Sue

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