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Emotional and financial help

I was diagnosed with rrms a couple of years ago.
I have applied for PIP,been turned down, reapplied and now waiting for the appeal to go to court(the CAB have helped me throughout the whole process)
I have just returned to work(2 days) after months off shielding and am finding it extremely difficult.I literally cannot move the following day and it takes me days to recover,my brain fog is so bad I can’t remember things I’ve just been told ,and I keep falling over…The whole thing is really getting me down…not just the appeal process but the ms ,the fact no-one understands how awful I feel just cos I look ‘ok’ and just generally trying to cope with life.
I know people have it alot worse than me and I’m not the only one suffering but I really don’t know what to do next or who to turn to.
I have 2 young children and my partner works long hours so is unable to help out alot at home.
I already take citalopram for depression.
I have just started my last course of mavenclad and am worried about returning to work with lowered immunity on top of everything else…
Any help or advice would be appreciated

PIP can be paid regardless of your income, savings or National Insurance contribution record and is a tax free benefit. You can get PIP even if you are working or studying.

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What anon says is correct, if you haven’t already, have a look at.benefits and work, well worth joining.

Thank you for your reply…this is the information I was given by the CAB too

Thankyou…I will take a look

Pride, self esteem, trying their best not to be beaten by such a sh*tty illness, trying to put a bit of “normality” back into their lives, financial reasons that benefits wont cover.

Lots of reasons why some people with MS and other disabilities continue to work.

Personally I take my hat off to them all.

And then if/when the time comes they can apply for the benefits that they well deserve knowing that they tried their best.

Obviously there are some unfortunate enough that they just cannot work no matter how much they want to, so these people need and should have immediate access to benefits.

I bet my last penny that if a poll was taken on here you would find that the majority of members would just love to be able to go to work, even for a few hours a week if they could physically manage it.

Not every person with a disability see’s the benefits system as the golden ticket to get on the gravy train.

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I have worked all my life,since 13 years old with a weekend job…all the reasons you mentioned are the reason whyibcontinue to try and work.I have never claimed any benefits.I worked full time upto having my children…and then part time since then.I have tried my best to carry on but as my condition is deteriorating and I feel I can’t physically or mentally work any more hours than I do then I thought that maybe the system that I’ve paid into for years might just be able it help me out. I am one of those who don’t see it as a golden ticket. I completely agree with everything you said.

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PIP is there for you, to help you with the extra financial burden that accompanies disability and isn’t reliant on what you earn or your ability to work.
When you fill in the forms it talks about help you need even if you aren’t currently getting that help.
Someone else mentioned the benefits and work website. You will find it useful and there is also a forum on there.

It’s so hard bringing up children when you are poorly. All the best to you.

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100% agree, even if you work you can still apply for PIP.

It’s an absolute nonsense mentality to think you shouldn’t be working if you have a disability or that you shouldn’t be applying for benefits to help with your costs or burdens if you’re working and disabled.

You’re entitled to do both, it’s how YOU manage your disability and finances.

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Thankyou so much

you are physically and mentally knackered - it’s bad enough struggling with the m.s. without having to struggle with the baggage that comes with it.

I hope you are getting family support - if not then it’s a steep mountain to climb.

You are going to have to consider different options -

can adaptations be made at work?

would you get a works pension if you had to finish work.? (not a good idea to resign.)

do you get sick pay and for how long?

what are the implications of reducing your working hours re. pension?

have you looked at other benefits you may qualify for -

perhaps I’m getting this wrong but I get the impression that you’re being sort of apologetic for finding it difficult to work and having to look for support from benefits.

If that’s the case then stop it - none of us asked to have this crap disease and all the problems it brings.

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good advice Crac,.

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Scudger - I disagree with everything you have written on this thread.

We sometimes disagree with posters and we don’t go out of our way to ‘flannel’ each other.

We have all been at some time in that canoe without a paddle!

What we should all have is a degree of empathy and if we can we should respond empathetically.

Scudger, if you don’t understand what a poster is saying then perhaps it’s better if you don’t respond!

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cracowian…I cant see a response from Scudger…has he gone anon?

Boudsx

Thankyou so much for your reply.I have looked into other benefits but don’t think I qualify as I’m working and so is my partner…but you’re right…I am physically and mentally knackered. I would only get basic SSP and I’m not old enough for me to claim any pension. I can’t really reduce my hours as I can barely afford to survive as it is… I’m sorry ,I know I’m sounding negative but this whole thing is getting me down. Thankyou though

vic71 - I wonder if you have someone supporting you - someone who will take your concerns seriously and find answers to your questions re benefits etc.

we sometimes give the impression we’re doing alright but in fact are floundering a bit.

Go through your relatives - friends - colleagues and select the person who you think would be supportive. It may be someone who has been in a similar position.

Then ask him/her straight out for his/her help. These helpful people are there but perhaps feel they don’t want to interfere.

Why don’t you make the first move

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