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Crying for no reason

I had a bad relapse a few months ago, and since then I’ve been having a problem with crying for virtually no real reason. I had a milder problem with this in the past, but I’m finding it a bit alarming at the moment. I can start sobbing uncontrollably with the slightest trigger. It’s really awful. I read that this is called Pseudobulbar Affect and the drug Nuedexta is used as a treatment for it. I’m not good with drugs, but if things don’t improve I will have to try something. Sometimes I laugh very easily too, but at least that feels good. The crying doesn’t. Thanks to anyone who shares their experience of this.

Hi Kara

I too have had a relapse completed steroid treatment

and since then my mood has been extremely low and

I too have had crying very much the same so I do sympathise…

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Hi Kara

Is it that you are feeling very low so the slightest thing sets you off, or is it that you’re feeling okay but still cry?

Teddie

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Hi Teddie, that’s a really good question, and has made me think. At the beginning I was feeling fine but found myself crying easily, but now I think it’s a combination of also feeling low and crying easily…if that makes sense. I don’t cry at totally inappropriate things…it’s just that it feels over the top, and not normal crying. Thanks for you reply.

Do you think that there’s a possibility that things are getting on top of you but you’re trying to stay strong? Some things will out whether we like it or not! Either way it’s worth talking to your MS nurse (if you have) or your GP.

I had depression, which crept up on me. For many years I would be tearful at the slightest thing but after my mother got cancer and died it got much worse until I was suffering full blown depression. I had counciling for a year which help me deal with my mothers illness and death (I could cope with the fact that I had lost her but had trouble copping with her illness and death). But losing a parent brings your own mortality in to sharp focus and suddenly my future with MS was brought in to shape focus and I couldn’t get past that. I was just thinking about antidepressants when I was prescribed Amantidine for mental fatigue and the change has been amazing! The depression has lifted and, even though I still get sad/angry/frightened about the restrictions that MS has put on my life and the future, the bleakness has gone. But the strangest thing, that I only realised by reading your post, is since I have started feeling better I haven’t cried at a single children’s film or picture of a baby fox, I have not cried because someone suggests that I could do something differently etc etc. So now I’m wondering if my past weepieness was not Pseudobulbar, as I had assumed it was, and was in fact the result of mental fatigue.

I suppose the point I’m trying to make (in a rather long winded way, sorry!) is don’t assume that this is the “new you”, try and check that there is not an under lying cause.

Oh thought it might be worth mentioning, at the same time as I started taking Amantadine I also started taking quite a high dose of vit D3 and a low salt diet (both recommended by my neurologist)

Sorry I’ve rambled on!

Teddie x

Do you think that there’s a possibility that things are getting on top of you but you’re trying to stay strong? Some things will out whether we like it or not! Either way it’s worth talking to your MS nurse (if you have) or your GP.

I had depression, which crept up on me. For many years I would be tearful at the slightest thing but after my mother got cancer and died it got much worse until I was suffering full blown depression. I had counciling for a year which help me deal with my mothers illness and death (I could cope with the fact that I had lost her but had trouble copping with her illness and death). But losing a parent brings your own mortality in to sharp focus and suddenly my future with MS was brought in to shape focus and I couldn’t get past that. I was just thinking about antidepressants when I was prescribed Amantidine for mental fatigue and the change has been amazing! The depression has lifted and, even though I still get sad/angry/frightened about the restrictions that MS has put on my life and the future, the bleakness has gone. But the strangest thing, that I only realised by reading your post, is since I have started feeling better I haven’t cried at a single children’s film or picture of a baby fox, I have not cried because someone suggests that I could do something differently etc etc. So now I’m wondering if my past weepieness was not Pseudobulbar, as I had assumed it was, and was in fact the result of mental fatigue.

I suppose the point I’m trying to make (in a rather long winded way, sorry!) is don’t assume that this is the “new you”, try and check that there is not an under lying cause.

Oh thought it might be worth mentioning, at the same time as I started taking Amantadine I also started taking quite a high dose of vit D3 and a low salt diet (both recommended by my neurologist)

Sorry I’ve rambled on!

Teddie x

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Not only have I rambled on I also posted it twice, not sure how! Sorry

Thanks Teddie. Yes. Your message has really made me think. I have had a lot to cope with in the past 6 months on top of the MS relapse, so I may just be emotionally exhausted. I’ve had MS for over 20 years, so I’m well used to living with the ups and downs of it all, and I’m quite tough on myself. Crying at ‘children’s films and pictures of baby foxes’ made me smile, as that is exactly what I am like. With me it can be random acts of kindness that trigger it also…both the giving and the receiving. The weirdest thing. I have a neurology appointment in a few weeks, so I will see how I am by then. Thanks for making me think and smile. X

I’m grateful for your post. You didn’t ramble on. Thanks for sharing. Xx

Yes"random acts of kindness"!

I was dx around 25 yrs ago and thought I’d come to terms with it but I think that I’d just pushed it to one side. I also felt that I’d only just accept and adapt to one set of MS problems and the next lot would spring up, it felt as though the goal posts kept moving!

I’ve been told that I have spms but I’ve never had a big relapse, just a slow but steady decline, so I think that it’s more likely to be ppms.

​Sorry you’ve had a difficult six months but glad you got a neuro appointment soon.

Give yourself a break. Ask yourself “if I was as tough on someone else as I am on myself, would they find the pressure to much and end up crying?” I bet the answer would be yes!

Well I’m off to look at pictures of baby foxes and cakes, that I’ll never get round to making, on Pinterest

Hi LittleRay. Thanks for sharing your experience. I hope you too feel brighter soon. X