Anyone read any good books lately?

I’ve just read ‘sweetness in the belly’ by Camilla Gibb, it was quite enlightening.

Any other good books out there?

Wendy x

I found a ‘a street cat named bob’ by James bowan to fill me with hope and belief in my ability to still do things Neil

I do love a good book :slight_smile: Just finished Remains of the Day - thought it was fantastic. Not a rip-roaring page turner but quite brilliant. Haven’t seen the film so I’m not sure if that would affect enjoyment of the book. The Hunger Games books are very enjoyable too. Got the latest Jack Reacher book for Christmas. I’ve read them all so far but had gone off the whole series after Tom Cruise was cast in the Reacher movie! New book was classically easy to read and definitely entertaining. Currently reading ‘I am Pilgrim’ - utterly addictively absorbing! Paulo Coelho’s ‘The Alchemist’ is good for positive vibes :slight_smile: Pass on any tips of your own!! :slight_smile:

Hi Corkie I asked for some books for christmas as wanted something to read while the other half snores away and i cant get to sleep. I received the Harry Potter books and they are fab! Nearly finished the 1st one already! I know they arent everyones cuppa tea but iv really got into it. X

Hi Wendy! Great thread idea. Love, love, love my books, but sorry there are no fiction titles, I’m afraid. I can only do Fact so Non Fiction ideas from me:-

  1. Just finished Paul Kimmage’s The Fall and Rise of Matt Hampson. Fantastic read. Tells the true story of former rugby player, Matt Hampson (21 yrs old) who suffered a horrific injury in an England under 21 rugby match. He was subsequently paralysed from the neck down and dependent on a ventilator to breathe. There is always someone worse off and I will never complain.

  2. Before that, Meredith Daneman’s Margot Fonteyn. I have always loved Ballet, in particular, Margot Fonteyn. Saw a very good documentary about her and had to learn more. A brilliant read, but really rather sad. Just made me admire her more.

  3. Before that, Mark Purdey’s Animal Pharm- One Man’s struggle to discover the truth about Mad Cow Disease and Variant CJD. Mark Purdey was a Purdey Guns descendent. Brilliant, clever man. A true maverick who wanted to discover the truth about the role of organo-phosphates in causing these illnesses. He will be proved right one day. Unfortunately, he died of a Brain Tumour in 2006.

  4. My Christmas present this year is James Fallon’s The Psychopath Inside. A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain. James Fallon is a successful Neuroscientist. Perfect upbringing, happily married and a very respected Academic. The book tells the story of his discovery that he possesses the brain of a psychopath. Obviously, a bit too early to comment, but I’m in no doubt that it will be a very good read.

Happy reading Book Worms

Tracyann xx

Minette Walters - her books are bit long but an excellent author.

Wendy,

It’s not a book recommendation, but you may be interested - I just joined two booklovers’ websites, called Goodreads, and Librarything. They are both a similar concept - you can catalogue books you own, or have read/want to read, and search for others.

I would say Goodreads is slightly more mainstream/mass market, but a drawback is you have to rate 20 books before it starts generating recommendations for you. I don’t always want to rate books I’ve read. Goodreads is a bit more literary/intellectual, but it will generate recommendations just from books on your list, without you having to rate them first. You can also see users whose libraries overlap with yours - meaning other stuff they read might appeal to you too.

Both sites have forums, so you can discuss a particular work, author, or genre if you want.

I’ve literally only just joined so don’t know if they’re really any good, or if I will stay with them. But I was trying to get a bit of moral support to read more this year. I used to absolutely love it, and have probably hundreds of books at home, still waiting to be read one day. Since getting the computer, and being online all hours, my reading has trailed away almost to nothing. I’m not anti the Internet - I’m sure I read and learn interesting things there too. But it’s a shame my lovely books are crying out for someone to read them.

I think one of the sites I mentioned (possibly both) even has “readathons”, where members simply make a commitment to read at a certain time. You don’t all have to read the same thing (although you can), and there aren’t any forfeits if you don’t do it. But I thought just making an agreement I’m going to read at a set time might get me motivated.

Tina

x

Sorry, I meant to say Librarything is the slightly more literary/intellectual of the two - more likely to discuss the classics than the latest Dan Brown - BUT neither has any rules about what you should read or discuss - just a slightly different atmosphere in each.

Tina

x

Hi

I finished The Book Thief fairly recently, and think it’s the best book I ever read. It’s not plot driven, more about the characters, and I got totally drawn in their lives. I finished it when I was sat in hospital having my tysabri, with tears in my eyes - I didn’t want it to end. I’ve tried reading a couple novels since then but gave up, because it’s not the characters I’d grown to love in the Book Thief! They’ve just made a film of it which comes out fairly soon. I’m in two minds as to whether to see it - films of books almost always disappoint when you’ve read the book first.

Dan

Hi Tracyann

I’m not one for non fiction unless it’s a biography or autobiography but must say your last 2 books sound fascinating. My other half and I have often wondered what happened with the CJD theory and wonder if it is linked to so many people having dementia, probably not but it does sound interesting.

Now your book 4 I know a little about as I’ve heard this Neuroscientist speaking about his research; maybe on a horizon programme but definitely on radio 4. It proves my own theory that a bad upbringing can often lead to a psychopathic adult, not always but if you have all of the genetic material there too…

2 books that I intend to put on my kindle this year.

Wendy x

I’ll look that one up, thanks Neil.

Wendy x

Goos for you SammieJo

I loved the film Dr-F; acting was superb.

Wendy x

Thanks I’ll be adding to my list, I also love Sarah Walters another terrific writer.

Thank you Tina that’s really interesting, can’t say I remember most of the books I’ve read and do lose the plot sometimes and have to reread a paragraph or 2 to get back into the story these days but it’s nice to know these clubs are available at home and in our own time.

Wendy x

[quote=he_funk]

Hi

I finished The Book Thief fairly recently, and think it’s the best book I ever read. It’s not plot driven, more about the characters, and I got totally drawn in their lives. I finished it when I was sat in hospital having my tysabri, with tears in my eyes - I didn’t want it to end. I’ve tried reading a couple novels since then but gave up, because it’s not the characters I’d grown to love in the Book Thief! They’ve just made a film of it which comes out fairly soon. I’m in two minds as to whether to see it - films of books almost always disappoint when you’ve read the book first.

Dan

[/quote

I know what you mean about some films ruining books, have not yet got over what they did to Captain Correlli’s Mandelin!

I will add it to my list though; so thank you.

Good New Year Thread Corkie,

Love my books - and read quite a wide selection. Not so keen on auto-biographies/biographies. Like you l did find TraceyAnn’s selection 3/4 interesting - so will look for these. Had a good friend die of CJD - about 15yrs ago. He was our vicar - and its thought he contracted CJD whilst on holiday. Research found that someone from Canada - who was on the same trip died of it before he did.

l have just read Santa Montifiore’s Summer House. Now this book was a ‘present’ - and l admit if l had seen it on a library shelf l would have discounted it. But being short of something to read - l did read it - and surprised myself at how much l enjoyed it.

Which goes to show you have to keep an open mind. Now one of my favourite authors is the Scots Lass lsla Dewar - she is not writing quick enough for me as l have read them all. Shall have to email her and tell her to get on with it!!! As my memory is not what it should be - l have ‘returned’ to books once read. And have just finished my favourite lsla Dewar - Keeping up with Magda. l love her characters - you feel you really know them - and can imagine how they look/talk/walk. l enjoyed it just as much the second time. Wish l had not given away all the others - time to look up amazon and get some more secondhand ones. Usually they are only a 1p plus the postage. By the time l have got my car out and driven to the library l have spent more then the postage cost on petrol.

Also love Tess Gerritsen/Lisa Gardner/Lee Childs/Michael Connelly - so quite a variety.

Street Cat Bob is the next book l shall read - Mum was given this for her birthday - and has passed it on to me. My mum reads all day - and l supply the books. Her memory is bad - so l do ‘recycle’ books that she has forgotten that she has read.

l have on the go - The Grain Brain - Dr Perlmutter. lts full of interesting facts - and is the sort of book you dip in and out of. Heather HCD recommended it.

For xmas l bought my mother a new reading lamp - standard. lt is called Lifemax - and the light is ‘daylight’ and very eco friendly. Giving a bright natural light but only using 15watt. lt is supposed to also help with SAD. She loves it - and l was surprised what a good light it is for reading - bright but without glare - easy on the eyes. So successful was it l bought the bedside/table lamp for her as well. lt has made such a difference to her - so might get myself one. She is 90 yrs young - and hates me buying her anything as she thinks she will not live long enough for me to get my monies worth!! So l told her l want her to ‘leave them to me in her will’. Which made her laugh.

Happy 2014 reading to you all.

I use goodread.com a lot and I have an online library account with our city library. The combination works really well for me (part-time wheelie). I search for book using goodreads - using their recommendations, friend recommendations, special interest groups, book clubs etc then use the library search and reserve it online. I then just go and pick up the books which are held ready for collection (all neatly bundled with my name on :slight_smile: ). The library will buy in any book they don’t have in stock and I have used this service frequently. The library has electronic self serve counters at wheel chair height and disabled parking right outside. When I was incapacitated for three months, hubby used to do the return and pick up for me. I can have twenty books out at a time and can renew them online. Even at 1p per book plus £2.80 postage I found it very expensive to keep buying books on Amazon.

I read a lot and have a pretty eclectic taste but favourites have been:

  • Book thief as already mentioned was great
  • The Corfu Trilogy - Gerald Durrell
  • Between shades of grey - Ruta Sepetys
  • The Help - Kathryn Stockett
  • The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society - Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows
  • The Kitchen House - Kathleen Grissom
  • A lesson before dying - Ernest J Gaines
  • Before I go to sleep - S J Watson
  • The shadow of the wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  • The railway man - Eric Lomax
  • Bury me standing - Isabel Fonseca
  • The elephant whisperer - Anthony Lawrence
  • The road home - Rose Tremain
  • Love in the time of cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  • Lonesome dove - Larry McMurtry
  • Snow falling on cedars - David Guterson
  • Me before you - Jojo Moyes
  • Hotel on the corner of bitter and sweet - Jamie Ford
  • Small island - Andrea Levy
  • Labyrinth - Kate Mosse
  • Sea of Poppies - Amitov Ghosh
  • Candlemoth - RJ Ellory
  • The heart is a lonely hunter - Carson McCullers
  • Cutting for stone - Abraham Verghese
  • A thousand splendid suns - Khaled Hosseini
  • A tree grows in Brooklyn - Betty Smith

Thanks for the suggestions Tracyann!! I’ve just ordered Animal Pharm for my Dad - he’s an eco-warrior organic farmer and conspiracy theorist so I’m sure the book will resonate with him. A similar type of book concerning the arms trade is ‘As Used on the Famous Nelson Mandela’ by Mark Thomas. I fancy getting the psychopath book for myself - the brain is an amazingly complex organ and DNA has such a big influence on who and what we are - it’s fascinating! Less fascinating is all the crap that develops when the brain is functioning ‘sub-optimally’. Although it IS really quite fascinating, if you can detach yourself from the crap that comes with it :slight_smile: Some more recommendations - The Road by Cormack McCarthy - grim, oh so very grim. A reminder, if it was needed, that things are never so bad they can’t be worse. Haunting. Build your bunker now!! Mans Quest for Meaning by Viktor Frankl - staying with the ‘grim’ theme but with an overall positive spin… It’s non-fiction written by a concentration camp survivor Game of Thrones books by George RR Martin - an epic series, not for the squeamish or prudish. Lots of gore and medieval soft porn, but the storyline is captivatingly complex with strong characters to love or hate. And the author has no qualms about killing off popular, ‘good’ characters at regular intervals. Kite Runner was another very good book but the name of the author escapes me. I’ve used up my allotted powers of concentration for the time being - time for another coffee :slight_smile:

Thanks for the suggestions Tracyann!! I’ve just ordered Animal Pharm for my Dad - he’s an eco-warrior organic farmer and conspiracy theorist so I’m sure the book will resonate with him. A similar type of book concerning the arms trade is ‘As Used on the Famous Nelson Mandela’ by Mark Thomas. I fancy getting the psychopath book for myself - the brain is an amazingly complex organ and DNA has such a big influence on who and what we are - it’s fascinating! Less fascinating is all the crap that develops when the brain is functioning ‘sub-optimally’. Although it IS really quite fascinating, if you can detach yourself from the crap that comes with it :slight_smile: Some more recommendations - The Road by Cormack McCarthy - grim, oh so very grim. A reminder, if it was needed, that things are never so bad they can’t be worse. Haunting. Build your bunker now!! Mans Quest for Meaning by Viktor Frankl - staying with the ‘grim’ theme but with an overall positive spin… It’s non-fiction written by a concentration camp survivor Game of Thrones books by George RR Martin - an epic series, not for the squeamish or prudish. Lots of gore and medieval soft porn, but the storyline is captivatingly complex with strong characters to love or hate. And the author has no qualms about killing off popular, ‘good’ characters at regular intervals. Kite Runner was another very good book but the name of the author escapes me. I’ve used up my allotted powers of concentration for the time being - time for another coffee :slight_smile: