Forum

Walking problems

Hi all been a long time since I’ve posted on here but the thing is I had an appointment with physio today and she’s suggested I try using a walking stick or 1 crutch…thing is I don’t think I’ve ever thought about this thing getting worse and myself requiring walking aids.

im just looking for any advice on how to deal with this and how to start using an aid in public as I never thought it would be like this!!

thanks

barry

Hi Barry

Sorry to hear you’ve reached this milestone. Needing aids, walking or otherwise, can take a bit of coming to terms with.

One way to think of it which might help, is do the aids enable you to do things that your MS is making difficult? In which case you are getting one over on the MS.

Good Luck

Anne

Hi Barry,

I went down this road a bit back. Look at it like this:
If you are a touch unsteady when walking, a stick is a simple way of saying that you have not been at the booze.
What you have to watch out for is the idiot (must not use banned words here) who will try to walk between you and the stick.
Then there will be the other (banned) idiot who will rush to get in front of you, and then stop dead to look at something.
A crack on the ankle with the stick can focus their mind a bit here (get the apology in really fast).
A crutch is a bit more obvious than a stick, but some aforementioned idiots need something more than a tap on the ankle - a brain transplant perhaps.

Just be aware that you may end up needing more than one stick.

Geoff

Hi Barry

I know that feeling. I had a disabling relapse 2 years ago and had to admit that a walking stick would help with the pain in my leg. I was really worried that it would be ‘giving in’ but the sensible folks on here made me see that it was better than being stuck indoors when a stick would help me get about. Being me, I bought a bright red stick because if you have to have one you might as well have one that reflects your personality, eh? I was a bit self conscious to start with and used it away from my home town the first few times until I had got used to it. I don’t know why I worried because most people didn’t give it a second glance. It depended on my mood and/or the person asking as to whether I was honest about why I was using the stick if anyone did ask. I had a second relapse 3 months later affecting the other leg so I was really glad of the stick then.

Now, I only use the stick for longer walking distances and it’s more for balance and the pain and discomfort that comes on when I’ve been walking for 15 minutes or more. It’s better for me to use the stick from the outset if I know I’m going to be walking some distance as it keeps the pain at bay for longer and I don’t get so wobbly so quickly.

I can only repeat the advice given to me 2 years ago. Far better to have a stick and be safe than to not have a stick and risk a fall. Mine is a folding one so it can be kept folded up in its case if I don’t feel I need it but its there just in case. Give it a try - I bet, like me, you’ll be glad you did.

Tracey x