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Mobility scooter to take on holiday?

I have got two holidays coming up this year, a weekend at Pontins and a week in Egypt for my 40th. I am worried about getting about when I’m there as I can’t really walk any distance now, and I don’t really leave the house when at home, if I do I just tend to go in the car to shops where I can push a trolley and sit down regularly! In Egypt we will not be venturing out of our all-inclusive hotel, as we have done the sights before, but I am still fretting about getting round the complex, to the restaurants from our room etc.

I have never used a scooter but I’m beginning to think one would be good for when I go away. I want a lightweight, easy folding one, that will go in the boot of the car for Pontins and on the plane for Egypt.

I can’t afford to buy a scooter at the moment so ideally I would like to hire one…does anyone know anything about this? I am in the West Mids. I’ve searched online without success - there are lots of companies that hire out scooters to holidaymakers, but they all seem to be in Spain or Cyprus!

I would also consider buying a lightweight, folding scooter through finance/credit if this were possible, but again I can’t find any company that does this online.

Thanks in advance

Hello there.

Pontins does have disabled facilities.Such as ground floor apartments and wheelchair hire,I am not sure if they do mobility scooters.You must ring them in advance if you wish to hire a wheelchair.

http://www.pontins.com/accommodation/disabled-facilities/

As for Egypt you should contact the hotel or get your booking agent to check if they have mobility scooters for visitors usage.

You can hire scooters short term.I dont know what area you live in to see if there is a hire company in your area,but try these:

You can google scooter hire for your area.

I hope this helps.

Charlie,x

Hello,

I use a mobility scooter called travelscoot, look it up www.trsavelecoot.eu. Done a blog about it on my website www.aid4disabled.com. Also look at the youtube I did about it

It is so good, only weighs 20 kg, Easy to fold up, goes on planes, trains,buses and car boots

Don’t think you can hire, try google cos some shops might have one as 2nd hand stock. UIt costs about 1500 Euros but is a very sensible investment. I could not survive with out it. gives me independence and a better quality of life.

I hope this helps. Do keep in touch via website or Facebook, I would like to know how you manage

Good luck,

Patrick

Sorry to be a spoilsport but Pontins is in receivership,and last year we spent an apalling three nights at their Southport hell hole. I had my scooter with us,the drop kerbs were a joke and the ground floor flat had a 12 inch step to gain entry. There was a badly made wooden ramp between 15 ‘disabled friendly’ flats blah blah.

I spoke to the Civil Aviation Authority last week regarding scooter batteries, and in a nutty shell ,the airline dictates what sort of batteries are OK. Some of them will not carry lead acid batteries anymore,but some will…

As for not having used a scooter you could go for test drives at local mobility stores and try out allsorts. They don’t know you’re not buying yet If you do don’t forget to have a whizz outside. Hiring a scooter is difficult 'cos unscrupulous people used to swap the batteries for their knackered ones, hence mobility stores stopped renting them out.

You could try the local branch of the MS Society for a grant towards a buggy, and they might have one you could borrow.

I went on a six day Nile cruise followed by a week in Luxor in1997. A very hot,grubby but fascinating country.

Wb

No help with scooter hire as I am in Australia but if you do get the money to buy a scooter I strongly recommend the Luggie. I have owned one for about 5 months now (thank you MS Australia!) and it has revolutionised my life.

Hopefully you will be able to find a mobility shop that hires these.

The video on this link is very accurate and not exaggerating its claims at all and best of all, I can get this in and out of my car by myself with ONE hand!!

http://localmobility.co.uk/product_info.php/products_id/1280

Cheers,

Belinda

Hello Belinda,

Luggie looks lik,e a slick piuece of equipment. Two questions?

  1. What is gross weight of luggie, ie chassis, seat and batteries?

  2. Are the battreries wetcell or drycell?

Regareds,

Patrick

Hello Belinda,

I think you can buy Travelscoot in Australia. Try Google

Hi Patrick,

Gross weight is 23kg but because you can put it in the car by leaning it on the boot and using leverage to swing it in, you never actually have to pick it up. As I said I can put it in and out of my car by myself with literally one hand

The batteries are a Lithium-ion cell which is a very compact form of dry cell battery. This also makes flying with it easier as airlines have fewer restrictions on dry cell batteries. I have two batteries and a docking station in my house so I can leave the Luggie in the car and just take the battery in for charging.

It gives you about 5-7 hours on a full charge depending on the terrain. I have spent the whole day whizzing around the zoo on it withot the battery going flat.

We do have the travelscoot here. I tried one out and they are really nifty but no use for me as you have to use your feet for reverse. With no strength in my legs I would be stuck! Also being a 3 wheeler they are les stable and again without being able to jam my foot down to balance it I would come a cropper but they are a brilliant alternative for someone who is more mobile than me but still needs a scooter.

I had to fight my OT tooth and nail to get her to approve the Luggie for me as she wanted me in a full electric wheelchair but I really wanted the Luggie. We did both agree that the travel scoot wasn’t stable enough for me though. I love my Luggie.

Belinda

Hello,

Pleased to find out info about a luggie from a user. I do agree with your criticsms of the Travelscoot. I am mobile in as much that I can walk around using a stick por rollator, and you do need to learn to drive it cos it only has 3 wheels.

The big advantage of both Travelscoot and Luggie is that they are nifty, fun to drive and do not brand you as bewing disabled.

Really nice to talk to you.

Enjoy the luggie and have a look at my website www.aid4disabled.com. OK it’s based in the UK so no use to you but if you do like it then say so on Facebook. You can probably buy most of the products in Australia anyway. If there is something there yhat is not mentioned then please contqact me at patrick.burkle@aid4disabled.com.

Regards,

Patrick

I wouldn’t be without my Luggie, but …

There are some things you should know: it’s not cheap (cheapest price is around £1,800 - more if you want armrest) and neither is the battery. One is supplied but, if you’re going to travel (or even a day’s shopping expedition) you need a spare; they cost a hefty £400. Like I say, a spare battery is an essential as, my experience of my Luggie is that the battery indicator is unreliable. Yes, it is lightweight, but only relatively so; at a little over 24kg it is at least half the weight of other boot scooters but these split into smaller, lighter pieces for easier handling; Luggie is a dead weight and I can’t manage it on my own. If you’re solo, you also need to be able to bend and/or squat to set the thing up - and have useful fingers to work the various clips; in other words, you need to be an able-bodied disabled person to use Luggie if you don’t have flunkie to assist! If you have a flunkie, make sure they love it and treat it nicely; there’s a tendency to drag it when in the fold position so that the front edge (in the scoot position) gets scuffed and damaged (it wasn’t long before bits broke off which ruined the aesthetics - remember, it cost £1,800!) and if a well-meaning bod leaves it in the vertical position when folded it can easily topple over, or lies it down folded with the seat uppermost, it can also get damaged. Mine has just gone in for repair as a result lost clips and a damaged control unit caused by non-obvious mishandling by others

Being lightweight means just that and the chances are that if you’re travelling with it, you might be wanting to go over some less than smooth terrain and, frankly, Luggie isn’t really man (or woman!) enough for the job; Luggie excels best on smooth, level ground at airports, stations, shopping malls etc.

If you want to lug your Luggie in and out of a car, you might find a hoist helpful, but check carefully with manufacturers first. I have an Autoadapt Carolift 40 hoist in a Peugeot 3008 Crossover which is a high vehicle with a split tailgate and the system is not very satisfactory unless, again, you have reasonable upper body strength, in which case you might be able to bypass the hoist and lift it in and out yourself.

What else? No lights, if you want to use Luggie at night; if you manage to find something suitable that clips on and off, you are going to have to take on and off every time you fold and unfold it after dark. (I have one on an elastic strap that I wind round the handle bar which works reasonable well. As Luggie is operated by a switch rather than a key it is vulnerable to theft if you want to leave it parked somewhere - outside a shop maybe that has a step - so you end up having to take it places with you and, if you’ve got shopping or luggage on board you’re unlikely to be able to manage that AND Luggie.

I got my Luggie from Local Mobility and, to start with, I couldn’t recommend them highly enough. Sadly, however, I have had some communication problems of late and I am not very happy with how my current service need is being handled.

Last but not least, Luggie is ***** uncomfortable over any significant distance or time period! It’s construction is pared down to the minimum so there is absolutely no padding meaning that it’s down right painful for me with a dodgy back (that pre-dates the MS) and a slim build (bony coccyx) and I never go on Luggie with a supply of painkillers.

Having said all this, would I be without it? The answer is definitely not (at least until something better comes along). It may drive me mad at times, but it also drives me where I want to be which is good news in a world (and country!) with varying accessibility, and there is no problem taking it on public transport. It’s also, as mobility scooters go, quite good looking and some head turner and I feel psychologically good on it, even if my feels it’s about to snap.

If you’ve got the cash, go for it, but not if you’re wearing rose tinted specs, and not if you’re on your own and physically weak, unless you’re prepared to grab strangers to help.

Helen x

PS I have never, ever got 5-7 hours out of a fully charged battery - hence the reason why I always carry a spare now. H

Hi Helen,

I was advised buy the supplier to charge my battery overnight for a minimum of 8 hours per charge and not just until the green charged indicator comes on. I have regular used my Luggie for a full day outing and as long as I switch it off when not actually tootling along, it lasts me the day easily.

I agree the seat can be a bit uncomfortable but I have found a sheepskin placed on it helps a LOT. I don’t fold mine right down into the compact form, too fiddly. I just lower the seat and then drop the telescopic handlebars down onto the seat before folding the seat back down over that. That way I can lean the front of the Luggie up against the boot lip of my car and sitting on the edge of the boot I just lean down and grab the back handle and lever it up and roll it in to the boot. I have almost NO upper body strength and for me that fact that I can get the Luggie in and out independently was one of its major selling pints for me.

It is interesting to hear of another user’s experiences. Just goes to show that it is so important to try a wide variety of products for yourself because everyone’s needs and abilities can be so different.

Cheers,

Belinda

Hello Helen & Belinda,

That’s was an incredibly useful; warts and all reply about the Luggie I own a Travelscoot and like you I would not be without it. There is a review of one on my Website http://www.aid4disabled.com/travelscoot/ plus a video.

Two questions, do you live in the Herts/Beds/Bucks area, if so could we meet up? I’m not allowed to drive (MS) but can use the train and take my Travelscoot with me. I would love to do a comparison of a Luiggie and Travelscoot on my website. If push comes to shove could I use your article. Contact me on patrick.burke@aid4disabled.com

Look forward to hearing from you

Patrick

Thanks for all your very helpful advice so far. I think I have decided on a Luggie as they sound great! Only problem now is how to pay for it…disappointing that sellers don’t offer interest free credit.