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MAJOR DEPRESSION, ANXIETY AND BPD - CAN ANYONE RELATE?

Hello

im finding things quite difficult just now, my ms has changed from rrms to spms fairly recently.

i have also been told i am living with BPD or boarderline personality disorder.

i also have major depression and anxiety as well. im finding it hard knowing i have been told i have bpd because of the stigma associated with this condition.

i already see this with have ing ms but i just wondered if there are any people here who either have bpd and ms or understand it as well.

hope your all well x moo

Moo Moo! Hello Michelle. here have you been sweetheart?

I often wonder how you`re doing. Did you ever take up the idea you had about working from home?

I`m really sorry to hear you are not doing too well.

luv POllxx

Hi moomoo

Replied to this, clicked on send, and was taken to the login screen to reset my pasword.

The short answer is not to worry too much about the BPD label.
It is just that, a label, and what it really means is that “We know that you have a problem, but we cannot spare the time to find out what it really is”.

So, you have four different conditions that I know of (MS, anxiety, depression, and BPD).
Lets fix the MS first (waves magic wand, sprinkles some magic pixie dust, Sorted!) as if …
Anything that would help reduce the anxiety or the depression would help with the other one of those two - and ease the BPD.

I really should not say any more, but I would advise you to try to stay away from medication type treatments if possible.
Notably, anti-depressants can actually increase depression in some people (with SSRIs being the worst offenders).

Geoff.

Hi,

I don’t have Borderline Personality Disorder (not to be confused with Bipolar Disorder - also commonly written “BPD”), but I’ve had a penpal who does for over 15 years.

I think many people see the words “Personality Disorder”, and assume it’s the same as “Psychopath”, but there are many different personality disorders. All of them cause problems with interpersonal relationships, but NOT all of them pose a threat to others, and often the individual worst affected is the person themselves - they are not violent, sadistic, or antisocial, although they may have thoughts of self-harm (but not harm of others).

BPD itself is a controversial diagnosis, with not all psychologists agreeing it even exists - although it’s in the American Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) - considered the practitioner’s bible! Some believe it’s just a position on a “normal” continuum, which we all find ourselves somewhere along. (Haha,started on this reply before seeing Doctor Geoff’s).

My friend does have a history of forming unstable and often unsuitable or abusive relationships, and does suffer badly from anxiety, and occasional thoughts of self-harm - which, to my knowledge, she’s never tried to put into practice, but she’s more upset by her inability to dismiss the intrusive thought she just might.

But she’s educated, interesting, and a conscientious worker. Just rather chaotic in her personal life.

BPD (or any PD) is not considered an illness, in the sense it’s how the person is, rather than something they’ve got. That’s why treatment options are rather limited and unsuccessful, as you cannot treat someone’s underlying personality (and something tells me it would be rather sinister if you could). It’s also the reason not everyone agrees with the medicalisation of it, because having a certain type of personality is not an illness. Are we in danger of medicalising anything that means: “Not like most people”, when it’s just the way some people are, and they’re not sick?

Tina

x

thanks tina

i too like your friend am educated and found out recently people with bpd tend to have higher than average iq’s but lower eq ( emotional quoutant) its all been so hard to even accept this new diagnosis esp as the stigma associated with such a label is often very harsh.

your totally right in saying that bpd and most personality disorders dont pose a risk to others but usually the person living with it.

i do however self harm now and am very suicidal esp when im not able to cope with things.

its not somthing people are able to understand really unless they are living with it themselves.

but its people like yourself who show people wioth conditions like i have that some are prepared to not remain in the dark about things and learn about somthing.

my ms has been rather neglected of late though as ive been thinking of all this alot.

anyway thankyou.

and geoff hi friend , how are you.

thankyou for your reply.

anyway better go need to get ready.

thanks everyone for replying.

moo

p.s hi poll

im sorry hun think yuour thinking of sombody else on here. my real name is caz

hope your doing ok x

moo

Hi Moo,

If you are now SPMS, I’m guessing there is no treatment, other than symptom relief, is there?

Therefore I do not think “neglecting your MS” will be an issue, as there’s not very much you could or should be doing about it anyway.

MS isn’t your friend - it doesn’t get peed off if you ignore it for a while. Sometimes I think it’s better NOT to give it too much headspace.

Obviously, I wish your reasons for being distracted from the MS were a bit happier, and that maybe you would have a nicer reason not to dwell on it. But I don’t think it’s an issue in itself that you’re not giving it much attention. I think it’s pretty guaranteed not to care, so not an extra thing you should be worrying about.

Tina

x

Hi, yeh I was wondering if you are Michelle…then realised you`re someone different. She had a similar username and has now gone off my radar.

Best wishes hun.

luvPollx

Hi moomoo,

sorry to hear you are having such a tough time. The transition to SPMS is a blow. It is not the end of the world though. But it does take some adjusting to. No wonder you are depressed! I feel that all your issues including BPD are related to having to cope with the news there will be no more remissions.

I passed the RR stage decades ago. I felt depressed and at times still do now and again. That is normal. Who wouldn’t feel depressed in that situation?I was prescribed Prozac which helped but after a few years I just kept forgetting to take it! I don’t take it at all now and manage ok.

This diagnosis of BPD is probably based on your mood and attitude at this time when you are vulnerable, low and dare I say it moody. I know I had some very negative moods and attitudes. Anyone who did not understand what I was going through probably thought I was a real moody cow :). So forget this BPD label as a previous commenter also advised.

You need understanding and support. Try to get some counselling where you can feel free in a non-judgemental atmosphere to talk openly about your feelings. After that you can look at the practicalities. At this stage they are likely to be minor but making changes now before they are absolutely necessary can take a weight off your mind. For example I put in a shower while I could still just about use the bath and am glad I did. If you drive, what about getting automatic transmission.

Most of all be kind to yourself. Forgive yourself for feeling low. You are entitled to feel that way. In time you will adapt believe me. Lots of love and best wishes, Angie

thankyou angie