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How has life changed?

Just a general question, may give me some insight into the future and give me some hope. How has your life changes after diagnosis and in what ways? Over what time period have any changes happened?

hi anon

i can understand where ur question is coming from but its so variable for each of us and if i answered u truthfully it would be of no help to you. make the most of life now, enjoy, deal with the future when it happens,as it happens, worry/fretting/guessing re it (tho understandable) changes nowt except assits you missing out on the now…

take care

ellie x

Hi

I agree with Ellie in that MS can be incredibly variable. You could ask every one of the 100,000 or so people in the country with MS this question and, while there will obviously be many similarities, every one of the stories will be unique. My brother & I could be a good example. After I was diagnosed, I was needing a wheelchair within 18 months. My brother, on the other hand, was 15 years older when he was diagnosed,having had different symptoms to me, and to see him you wouldn’t know there was anything wrong with him.

And the question of how has life changed is huge - I could bore you with an answer that’s as long as War & Peace if I told you of all the many ways my life has changed over the last 10 years. There’s obviously the physical stuff, but then there’s my emotional life, my thoughts & beliefs, my self-knowledge, my relationships with others, the life experiences I’ve had… And it’s not all negative - there’s a ton of positive stuff in there too, and I think I’ve grown massively as a person. If the chance of being healed came along tomorrow I’d obviously jump at the chance, but given the choice of either having had MS and been healed from it, or of never having had it in the first place, I’d definitely choose the first option.

I assume you’ve only been diagnosed fairly recently, and are afraid of the future. This is understandable - the future is unknown, and things that are unknown are scary. It’s like kids being scared of the dark - there’s all kinds of monsters hiding in the dark, and there’s all kinds of monsters lurking in our potential futures. And one of the things that generally lies at the heart of any fear is the worry that we’ll not be able to cope. Often though, the reality isn’t as bad as what we fear it will be. When I was diagnosed I couldn’t handle the idea that I’d need a wheelchair. Now I do, and you know what? Life goes on. I’ve coped. I’ve done a skydive. I’ve been to Wembley to see my team win the FA Cup. Life hasn’t ended. And yours won’t either. Life hasn’t come to a halt, it’s just taking a different direction. Things can be OK; you just need to change your definition of what being OK means. It won’t be easy, and it won’t be without pain & tears. But it is possible to still keep choosing life, even if you’re not able to choose it all the time.

Dan

[quote=“he_funk”]

Hi

I agree with Ellie in that MS can be incredibly variable. You could ask every one of the 100,000 or so people in the country with MS this question and, while there will obviously be many similarities, every one of the stories will be unique. My brother & I could be a good example. After I was diagnosed, I was needing a wheelchair within 18 months. My brother, on the other hand, was 15 years older when he was diagnosed,having had different symptoms to me, and to see him you wouldn’t know there was anything wrong with him.

And the question of how has life changed is huge - I could bore you with an answer that’s as long as War & Peace if I told you of all the many ways my life has changed over the last 10 years. There’s obviously the physical stuff, but then there’s my emotional life, my thoughts & beliefs, my self-knowledge, my relationships with others, the life experiences I’ve had… And it’s not all negative - there’s a ton of positive stuff in there too, and I think I’ve grown massively as a person. If the chance of being healed came along tomorrow I’d obviously jump at the chance, but given the choice of either having had MS and been healed from it, or of never having had it in the first place, I’d definitely choose the first option.

I assume you’ve only been diagnosed fairly recently, and are afraid of the future. This is understandable - the future is unknown, and things that are unknown are scary. It’s like kids being scared of the dark - there’s all kinds of monsters hiding in the dark, and there’s all kinds of monsters lurking in our potential futures. And one of the things that generally lies at the heart of any fear is the worry that we’ll not be able to cope. Often though, the reality isn’t as bad as what we fear it will be. When I was diagnosed I couldn’t handle the idea that I’d need a wheelchair. Now I do, and you know what? Life goes on. I’ve coped. I’ve done a skydive. I’ve been to Wembley to see my team win the FA Cup. Life hasn’t ended. And yours won’t either. Life hasn’t come to a halt, it’s just taking a different direction. Things can be OK; you just need to change your definition of what being OK means. It won’t be easy, and it won’t be without pain & tears. But it is possible to still keep choosing life, even if you’re not able to choose it all the time.

Dan

[/quote] spot on dude!! juju…

dan

u r so articulate! my life has changed beyond recognition… theres another thread re remembering ur ms diagnosis anniversary. i cant remember the exact date and have had to find a way with living with this inability to recall (amongst loads of other things!) hence my comments about living the now. its ‘bad’ enough that i cant recall stuff but its pointless beating myself up even more cos i cant manage the impossible! that took a long time to get my head round but it makes my simple life easier today-thats for sure!

e x

hi anon

i just KNEW it was ms so my diagnosis wasnt a surprise even though i got it for my 50th birthday!

i had been off work for 3 months and, to be honest, i couldnt face going back.

i got medical retirement 18 months later.

like dan, i have grown spiritually, mentally and emotionally.

its nearly my 5 yr ms anniversary and i’m still here (i think)

there are so many options for you, although it may not seem like it.

just seize the day (carpe dium?) if you’re having a bad day just sleep it off.

try to stay upbeat

carole x

ps

my friends with ms are the nicest people i know.