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MRI REPORT! HELP PLEASE!

I know Karen has kindly done a thread regarding reports but I just can’t get my head around it. Finally after waiting 3 months got my report so if anyone can help me undersand what it means I would be grateful.

THERE IS NO OBVIOUS ASYMMETRY TO THE OPTIC NERVES, EXTRAOCULAR MUSCULATURE OR GLOBES.

THE VENTRICULAR CONFIGURATION IS NORMAL. THERE IS SUBTLE SUBCORTICAL NODULE OF HIGH SIGNAL INTENSITY WITHIN THE SUPERIOR RIGHT FRONTAL LOBE. MILD NODULARITY IS SEEN ALONG THE PERICALLOSAL SUBSTANCE, PARTICULARLY ON THE LEFT SIDE, SUGGESTIVE IN THE APPROPRIATE CLINICAL CONTEXT, OF POSSIBLE EARLY DEMYELINATION. NO SIGNIFICANT FOCAL ABNORMALITY IS IDENTIFIED WITHIN THE POSTERIOR FOSSA.

Thanks in advance x

Just wanted to add that I am dx with rrms after lesions on spine, positive lp and a long history of problems. My last mri of my brain was unremarkable.

It basically says that your optic nerves and eyes look fine, that you have a small area of damage towards the top of the right half of your frontal lobe and there are suggestions of some damage along the edge of the corpus callosum (the main bit of white matter that joins the left and right halves of your brain), but that your brain stem and cerebellum look fine.

If your previous MRI was clear, this means that there has been new activity and/or some progression. (Sorry.)

Let me know if you want any more info.

Karen x

Thank you so much Karen. I always said to myself that I wouldnt bother you with my report but curiosity got the better of me lol! Have you any idea what those areas affect ie. What symptoms they would cause? Lindsay x

I’d get pretty bored if no one wanted to bother me with any questions - I do have to pass my day somehow :slight_smile:

The frontal lobe is important for loads of things including movement, sensation, decision making, personality, working memory, personality and controlling inappropriate behaviour. The superior part of the lobe, ie the upper part, suggests that it might be somewhere in or near the motor area, but that is a complete guess and I could easily be wrong! If it was there though, it would mean that the left side of your body would be affected in some way.

The corpus callosum is the main tract of white matter joining the left and right sides of the brain. It is a very common place for MS to attack. It consists of fibres that link bits of the brain that need to work together. For example, if you use two hands to reach for something, the left side of the brain is directing your right hand & arm and the right side of the brain is directing your left hand & arm and to work together to do it properly, the two sides need to “talk”. So, from birth, every time someone reaches with both hands, connections between the areas involved develop and strengthen so they work effortlessly. Those connections (and others like them) form the corpus callosum. Because it deals with making left and right work together, damage there can affect all sorts of things, e.g. reaching with both hands, being able to tell the direction of sounds or which side of your body you have more pressure or sensation on, eye movements and cognitive tasks. The cognitive stuff can be fascinating: some things are processed in only one side of the brain so when the corpus callosum is cut completely you can end up with someone who can’t tell you what a simple word is if they can only see it with the left eye, but they can still copy it / write it, and then when you switch the picture to the right eye, they can tell you what it is, but they can’t copy it any more!

Please note that MS does not tend to cause this level of damage to the corpus callosum; I’m talking mainly here about patients that have had it done surgically to stop terrible epilepsy (google “split brain patients”).

You did ask :slight_smile:

Kx

Thanks you so much again Karen. I have copied this for future reference.

Can I ask one more question? Could any of this cause a numb tongue (left side)?

No, I don’t think it could. Tongue sensation is from branches of the trigeminal nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve which start in the brain stem: google “trigeminal nerve pathway” for example. Actually, just seen that the Wikipedia page on the trigeminal nerve has some really good images. Unfortunately, MRI and symptoms often don’t match very well. That’s why a good neuro pays more attention to symptoms and clinical signs than MRI. Kx

Thank you Karen. It’s all very confusing. I would leave it to my neuro only I am having write a problem getting anyone to look at my report. I have posted anon on EDL. It’s called “who do I turn to”. Thanks again x