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Finding a new job

Hi I just want some advise, I am going to be made redundant soon.Just wondered how difficult it was to find a job for anyone I have RRMS.I have been in my present job for twelve years so feeling a bit worried about this job hunting again any advise would be appreciated. Thanks

It’s a ‘how long is a piece of string’ question.

It will of course depend on your chosen area, background, skill, qualifications, experience. If you want to work at the checkout in a supermarket, expectations will be different from those expected of a lawyer.

MS doesn’t always need to come into it.

By law, you don’t have to tell anyone you have MS and they aren’t allowed to ask about your medical history (with one or two exceptions). So, in theory, your MS shouldn’t come into it. I hope you find something soon. Karen x

[quote=“rizzo”] By law, you don’t have to tell anyone you have MS and they aren’t allowed to ask about your medical history (with one or two exceptions). So, in theory, your MS shouldn’t come into it. I hope you find something soon. Karen x [/quote] On the applications for my chosen field (teaching) there is a disability question. This has put me off applying for a new job as with largely invisible symptoms and 0 absences in 18 months I don’t feel the information is relevant. Is it legal for them to ask or not? Thanks. A

They are allowed to ask for equality monitoring purposes, and also if it is with a view to making reasonable adjustments. Usually, the question is worded in such a way that answering is not compulsory, or the answer is subjective, e.g. “Do you consider yourself to be disabled?”

However, there are some jobs where disability could be a safety issue, and I’m not sure if teaching might be among these. I’m sure it doesn’t affect your ability to teach, but might it affect how effectively you were able to deal with an emergency, for example?

What exactly do the forms say about WHY they want to know? If it’s connected with the safety of pupils, they’re probably within their rights to ask. If it’s for equality monitoring, they’re probably also within their rights, although you don’t usually have to answer.

Tina