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Latest instalment on the work situation (not MS)

Hi to all those who have been following my interminable saga (and any who are new to it, as well).

Well, today, Redeployment backed down, and said it was OK for me to be doing the work I had been doing - the work they told me only yesterday I must stop, because it was “against the rules”.

So it looks like the chap who’s been trying to get me a foot in the door has won this round, at least - they’re NOT going to stop me doing the only thing I was doing that might have potential as an ongoing role.

In other news, I still haven’t found out for certain whether I’ve been selected for redundancy. They had intended everyone should be told either way by tomorrow. They’re now saying they’re a bit behind, and nobody will be told before Monday. This means I cannot, under the procedure, leave the company any earlier than 18th July, instead of the 16th. Woohoo, two extra days’ money! I must be desperate. It’s a few quid though, so every couple of days is something.

I talk about being told “either way”, but in reality, that still won’t be the case, because those of us selected (I’m assuming, at the moment, that includes me) will be told it’s still subject to mitigation attempts.

So it aint over 'til it’s over.

Our little group of 28 needs to lose 15; more than half. I’ve heard “credible” rumours that two have volunteered (they’re at an age when they might have considered retiring anyway). But that still leaves 13 who’ll go, but don’t want to.

Tina

Hi Tina, thanks for the update, and NO, you are not boring us with it btw. I am glad redeployment have backed down, to me, that sounds like the sensible thing to do. Well, I guess you’re just going to have to hang on for a while longer till you find out if you have been selected, the waiting must be agony, for me anyway, I think it would be better to know one way or the other and as you say even when you are told, you’ve still got that month to do and didn’t they talk about you all working three months notice. Oh Tina I really feel for you. Is someone selected for redundancy really going to be motivated to do any meaningful work while working a month (or three months) notice. I don’t think I would. Cheryl:-)

Hi Tina, God it is going on isn’t it? They mess with people’s lives and then say ‘we need a couple more days’!

Well you will soon know one way or the other. At least redeployment backed down. I want to say to you, don’t take it for granted you will go. You might be ok… but Tina then I worry about giving you hope when there might not be any! All you can do is wait.

Keep in mind that MS does not like stress, so protect yourself as much as you can. Try the ‘this too will pass’ approach if you can.

Take care and thinking of you,

Pat x

I’ve just read your story. I’m 56 and don’t work because of my MS. I’m not ‘looking’ for work but my wife is an optometrist. I’m replying to your message because I’ve been there and I know what it’s like even without MS. Try to stay cool! (emotionally speaking - as they say, “you’re a long time dead!”) so just smile ‘and be happy’ - you could have something good coming your way. I’m married and I’m not looking for anyone - but I know what it can feel like (when you are single) - But you never know what is coming your way.

Smile and be happy,

Marcus. x.

Tina Marcus and other poster say it all. You have good friends that support you

Hi Tina,

Thanks for keeping us up to date. Good luck for the next few days. I do feel for you!

Boo x

Thanks both. Yes, it’s indeed still possible I won’t be picked, although keeping my job would be almost as big a shock as losing it, at this stage. What would it mean, in practice, since I still don’t have any proper work? In effect, to keep me, they’d have to evict someone who did have work, but who scored less favourably, for whatever reason. Are they really going to risk kicking out someone who did have a job, and giving it to someone who didn’t? Wouldn’t the redundant person appeal that their redundancy was automatically unfair, if their job was immediately handed to someone else? I thought one of the definitions of redundancy was you couldn’t just hand the work to someone else. There has to be a reduced need for the work itself, not the person. I just don’t know. I believe, from what I’ve been reading about it, that they will have to make some modifications to the weighting of the criteria, in respect of an employee with MS, since they probably can’t demonstrate the same flexibility and adaptability as an able-bodied colleague. I don’t think this concession extends to performance, though. The last two annual appraisals will be taken into account. Although I didn’t get a “bad” rating, on either occasion (“meets, occasionally exceeds expectations”) I don’t feel someone whose MS diagnosis and immediate aftermath spanned the period in question could really have done much better. Despite the “occasionally exceeds” bit, this descriptor is actually quite a mediocre rating (there are two better ones above it), and doesn’t attract many points. It is agony, just dragging on and on. I didn’t even feel this bad about my diagnosis, because somehow, I was much more philosophical. I think I acccepted I’d already been ill for ages, and therefore it wasn’t so much a bombshell, as putting a name to something I already knew. But with redundancy, there’s no saying: “Ah well, I was already redundant ten years ago, what’s in a name?” Or maybe it’s just that, for me, work made (makes) more of a contribution to self-esteem than health? I was always a bit careless and oblivious of health issues - not very in tune with my body. Maybe that’s why I took so long to realise I was ill? But I’ve never been careless or oblivious about work. T. x

Oh, sorry, that should read: “Thanks ALL”. I’m so slow that there have been a load more posts in the time it’s taken me to compose one. And I can’t do blushing smiley on the stupid iPad. T. x

Just heard today that the company I work for is making 10000 more redundant worldwide.

Our office had a lot of redundancies at the beginning of last year. I ‘missed out’ last time because of being on long-term sick. Who knows what’s happening this time. I must try and find out who I can talk to. The HR person I was contacting has left, and my ‘line manager’ doesn’t respond to my emails and all-but ignored me when I went into the office a few months ago.

Sometimes, like you, I think it would be easier if I just resigned and didn’t have to deal with it all! We both know that would be daft, don’t we? Remind me about that again, please?!?

[quote=“EllenC”]

Just heard today that the company I work for is making 10000 more redundant worldwide.

Our office had a lot of redundancies at the beginning of last year. I ‘missed out’ last time because of being on long-term sick. Who knows what’s happening this time. I must try and find out who I can talk to. The HR person I was contacting has left, and my ‘line manager’ doesn’t respond to my emails and all-but ignored me when I went into the office a few months ago.

Sometimes, like you, I think it would be easier if I just resigned and didn’t have to deal with it all! We both know that would be daft, don’t we? Remind me about that again, please?!?

[/quote] Ellen: You’re right, it would be daft! Turning away free money, right? Gotta hold out 'til we’re pushed, not jump. Hmmm, got a pretty good idea who you work for now - seen it in the news. The headlines certainly don’t get any better for those of us still chasing a dollar, do they? Tina

Tina, you are right. Redundancy means they have to get rid of the job… they can’t just get rid of the person and keep the job. They could be in trouble doing that. Some try to get round it by changing the job title but if the new person is doing basically the same job as the person made redundant, they have broken the law.

Pat x

Hi Pat,

Yeah, my understanding too. Although I gather there are some exceptions. Apparently, they CAN use a practice known as “bumping”, where there is an overall reduction in the pool needed for a particular type of work. So they could in theory make somebody redundant, but then refill their post, as long as they could show there was still a reduced need for that kind of work.

Whether they’d risk it or not, I don’t know. Might give rise to an appeal. But so might sacking an employee with MS… How defensive are they going to be?

The only other factor that might save me is cost. With 23 years’ service, I’m pretty expensive to get rid of. In initial consultation with the Union, they said cost wouldn’t be a factor in whether anybody stays or goes. But they’ve recently backpedalled on that slightly, saying they need to remain “mindful” of the overall bill.

So there’s a possibility they might look at mine, and say: “God, she’s expensive to pay off! Pick someone cheaper!”

I dunno. Rumours and speculation, all. Sometimes I think it’s “obvious” I’ll be going. Other days, I’m not so sure.

Tina

x

I continue to follow your story and wish you well whatever the end result may prove to be.

I know what its like with the threat of redundancy hanging over you like a continued limboland waiting for dx.

I also know what its like with companies holding their cards close and moving goalposts— as I found out yesterday that my job is being advertised although I am still off sick awaiting retirement .

Hang in there is all I can offer.

Take care

Pip

Re. work – Can’t work out whether or not you want to go or want to stay!

That’s probably because I’m not sure myself, any more!

I wouldn’t mourn the job at all, but DO still need the money. The chances of finding anything else that lets me work from home as much as I do, and pays similarly too, seem slim indeed.

I think any alternative is likely to be a lot harder work (not necessarily the work itself, but the daily commute and all that), for a lot less money.

With health deteriorating as time goes on, a job that makes more demands, for less, can hardly be good news… Neither is the stress of even having to look.

Tina

x

Hi Tina, have been following your story, i wish you well with whatever the out come, you dont need this stress!

sparkly xx

Thank you very much for the good wishes - and to everyone else who has posted them.

It’s hard to believe this has “only” been going on for three months. It feels more like three years!

Because I’ve been stripped of most of my work, it’s making the time pass even slower. However, I’m not allowed to leave the house on weekdays, and go and do something else, as I’m still employed by them, and therefore supposed to be both contactable and available during normal working hours.

The last thing I want to do at the moment is fall foul of any disciplinary code, by not being where I’m supposed to be. It’s all getting VERY cut-throat and ruthless at the moment, and I’m sure the company would jump at any chance to get rid of someone without paying the money.

I’ve never been one to take liberties, I don’t think - but now, more than ever, I have to make sure I do everything scrupulously by the book. I don’t want to give them any chance to claim that I broke contract first, and wasn’t entitled to any redundancy pay.

Tina

x