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Stem cel therapy is benfijbial for spms?

Hi thr,
m a case of spms.usd interfrone for 7yrs.my 1 side is getn efctd.
I wana try stem cel therapy
wil it help?m 25yrs,singl,scholar
plz sugst

I don’t have the answer
but

you might be interested in reading Stella & Marc’s Blog on

Stella’s Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) Blog

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/3181/

V

Hi Adya,

As things stand at the moment, my advice is under no circumstances pay for this.

Stem cell therapy shows great promise, but it’s still in the very early days with regard to evaluating both safety and efficacy.

There are genuine, properly-controlled trials going on, but places for these were filled up very quickly, as I understand it. I’m not sure whether any are still recruiting at the moment. If you let your neuro or MS nurse know that you are potentially interested, they should be able to advise whether there’s anything in the pipeline that you’d be eligible for.

If you don’t go through your neuro, but instead sign-up with a commercial organisation that claims to have had some success, I’m afraid I think you’re at risk from crooks and charlatans. It’s still very definitely at the research stage, and any organisation willing to take your money in return for what they claim is a safe and proven therapy is acting unethically, in my opinion.

Anitra wrote:
Hi Adya,

As things stand at the moment, my advice is under no circumstances pay for this.

Stem cell therapy shows great promise, but it’s still in the very early days with regard to evaluating both safety and efficacy.

There are genuine, properly-controlled trials going on, but places for these were filled up very quickly, as I understand it. I’m not sure whether any are still recruiting at the moment. If you let your neuro or MS nurse know that you are potentially interested, they should be able to advise whether there’s anything in the pipeline that you’d be eligible for.

If you don’t go through your neuro, but instead sign-up with a commercial organisation that claims to have had some success, I’m afraid I think you’re at risk from crooks and charlatans. It’s still very definitely at the research stage, and any organisation willing to take your money in return for what they claim is a safe and proven therapy is acting unethically, in my opinion.

I completely agree with Tina.

Alison
x

I think I would generally agree with what has been said but if you are dead set on doing something anyway that the Vicar of Baghdad has set up a clinic which was initially in Baghdad but has last I heard moved to Kurdistan so that they can treat foreigners.

A friend of mine was thinking of taking his wife there and was put in touch with the doctor running the clinic by the vicar, who himself has MS and the doctor advised that his wife was too affected by MS and therefore they were unlikely to achieve any results.

Travelling to Kurdistan has issues of its own so I am definitely not recommending the clinic. If you are interested the process has been written about by the Vicar in New Pathway’s, MSRC’s bi monthly publication. In my view the best source of information available on MS other than the web of course

Ah yes, the same publication that gave so much free publicity to Dr Troessel. They really messed up that time.
Don’t go. Do not in any circumstances go to Kurdistan - it’s seriously dangerous - one of the most dangerous countries for anyone who is not a Muslim to go to.
The vicar is (in my opinion) deluded.
“In March 2011 on a visit to America, he claimed to have been healed supernaturally of many of the effects of M.S. at Bethel Church, in Redding, California USA.”

From Wikipedia. Supernatural healing?

Whoops, I made a mistake. Kurdistan is moderately safe. However, to get there, you have to go through Iraq.

So where are these stemcells coming from?

If the Vicar of Baghdad claims to have been ‘supernaturally healed’ then which is true - the stemcells or the supernatural healing?

Here’s a bit from the Foreign Office Travel Advisories
“Shelling in the border areas with Turkey and Iran in the Kurdistan Region still occurs. You should seek advice on the situation in these remote border areas before travelling there.
Demonstrations in Sulaimaniyah in February 2011 resulted in the deaths of several protestors. You are advised to avoid large gatherings, crowds and demonstrations.”

Seriously, there’s a big stemcell trial starting and you may be lucky and get on it. So far, ‘real’ stemcell treatments look good, but I’m not sure if this different from that rather terrifying procedure that Stella is going through? I don’t know.

Hi Adya,

There are many very shonky clinics promoting stem cell therapy so be very, very cautious. The worst places are offering it in the form of an injection of “stem cells” straight into the spinal cord. Not only does this carry a very high risk of infection but the contents of the injection are usually completely bogus. Sadly there are many charlatans out there who will unscrupulously prey on vulnerable people and sell all sorts of quack cures. From what I have read about the Vicar of Bagdahd I would avoid the clinic he is promoting like the plague.

Having said that though, stem cells do hold a very real possibility in effective MS treatment and there are trials underway around the world. Here in Australia the Canberra hospital has been having success with their procedures.

I have included some links from Australian sources to give you an idea of what is in the pipeline. I am very interested in this too and want to talk to my neuro about whether stem call therapy may be an option for me. But it is not a cure and it is not suitable for all people. I would only do it under very clear guidance from a well qualified neurologist whom I trust.

http://www.stemcellcentre.edu.au/NewsEvents/Blogs/StemcelltherapyforMSudate.aspx

http://www.msra.org.au/increasing-use-stem-cell-treatment-ms

http://www.msra.org.au/stem-cell-treatment-australia

Hope this of some help to you.

Cheers,

Belinda