And still the scams come ...

This one is (so it says) from the Eubank Funeral Home.

It invites me to attend the funeral of my dear friend (just click here for details).

The sender’s address works out to be in Hungary
The address to click on for details is in the Netharlands
There is a Eubank Funeral Home, but it just happens to be in Canton, Texas

Of course, I have not clicked for details (might forward the post to my gmail account and look at it with an Apple Mac)
The interesting thing is that the layout is exactly the same as some mail I used to get from a firm of W eeding planners inviting me to a dea’r friends wedding (just click here for details).

Please do not fall for this one.

Geoff

Does it actually name the friend?

If so, it’s a particularly heartless scam to pretend someone known to you has died.

If not, then no reputable funeral home would send out invitations by e-mail, in a generic form that doesn’t even name the deceased, and saying you must click to find out. Often, just a little bit of thought tells you no bona fide business would carry on like this, or if they did, they’d quickly be out of business, as no bereaved family would be happy with such a crass and cavalier method of informing interested parties of the deceased’s sad departure. I think an e-mail is just about acceptable these days, especially when it’s increasingly common for people to have had friends whose postal address isn’t necessarily known to those making the arrangements. BUT, there’s e-mail, and there’s e-mail. Who’s going to authorise a message of the form: “A friend has died: click here to find out who!”?

Obviously, you didn’t fall for it Geoff. But for anyone who might waiver about whether to click on such a message, just think about whether this is normal etiquette for communicating that somebody has died, or had a serious accident, or whatever. Most of us, fortunately, probably haven’t had too much experience of receiving tragic news. But there are certain forms it takes, and certain forms it doesn’t. You’re not going to get a genuine message someone has died, without it being pretty up-front about who. Nobody genuine would cause the recipient the anguish of running through a mental list of all the people it might be, before clicking to find out.

It would begin straight away with something like: “It’s my sad duty to inform you that [person’s name] has died.”

Tina

Eubank Funeral Home…is it for worn out carpet sweepers?

pollx

[quote=“Boudica”]

Eubank Funeral Home…is it for worn out carpet sweepers?

pollx

[/quote] Ha,Ha poll my first thought was has the boxer Chris Eubank died i havent heard anything,then i read on its another despicale person trying to get computer details from us, keep allert people dont open a attatchment from someone you dont know.Keep safe people.

Barbara.xx

[quote=“Boudica”]

Eubank Funeral Home…is it for worn out carpet sweepers?

pollx

[/quote] That made me giggle poll :slight_smile:

How did I find out, Jen?
Well, the e-mail program I use has a facility where if I put the cursor on a “Click Here For Details” bit, it tells me what the real address (E-mail or URL) is hiding behind the words. It can be quite funny when a mail from a bank I do not even have an account with tells me that there is a problem with my credit card, and the “Click Here” bit turns out to be in Singapore, or Chile, or somewhere like that.

Geoff

Just had this one again this morning!

Geoff